Spiritual itinerary

Etapa 1

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 1. Loyola - Zumárraga (18,2 km)

Notes: Let us begin our journey calmly, taking up our subject seriously. It is very useful to spend some time reflecting on the Preparatory Prayer. If you find “depth” in some word or at some point, it is better not to move on, but to remain there, asking what the Spirit is saying and allowing it to speak to us in our heart. Ignatius tells us that “to know and taste something interiorly” is more important than knowing a lot about it.

Ask for the Grace I want: Lord, grant me the grace to feel your love in my life interiorly, and to be profoundly grateful for it.

Reflections: Spirituality has been defined as «turning one’s journey through life into a journey towards God.» We hope to transform our journey through Spain into a spiritual journey.

We begin by contemplating what surrounds us in these beautiful places near Loyola. We walk slowly, aware that it is a gift to be able to dedicate time to this encounter with God, with the world and ourselves. It is a privilege to be able to do these “exercises”! Let our hearts leap in gratitude as we begin our pilgrimage. The One who has loved us from the beginning and leads us in our lives is the One who has brought us here. With this conviction we begin our walk. God who is Father and Mother to us comes to meet us in every person and thing we see. May His presence fill us with gratitude.

Scripture:

Isaiah 55:1-11. God, in his love for me, invites me to come to Him.

Psalm 63. I respond to God by expressing my desire to meet him.

Final Colloquy: Sum up what I have thought about or felt during my prayer, talking to Jesus as one friend does to another. Be frank with him about what you have experienced and felt (or not felt) during this stage of your walk with him.

Loyola - Zumárraga

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 1. Loyola - Zumárraga (18,2 km)

Notes: Let us begin our journey calmly, taking up our subject seriously. It is very useful to spend some time reflecting on the Preparatory Prayer. If you find “depth” in some word or at some point, it is better not to move on, but to remain there, asking what the Spirit is saying and allowing it to speak to us in our heart. Ignatius tells us that “to know and taste something interiorly” is more important than knowing a lot about it.

Ask for the Grace I want: Lord, grant me the grace to feel your love in my life interiorly, and to be profoundly grateful for it.

Reflections: Spirituality has been defined as «turning one’s journey through life into a journey towards God.» We hope to transform our journey through Spain into a spiritual journey.

We begin by contemplating what surrounds us in these beautiful places near Loyola. We walk slowly, aware that it is a gift to be able to dedicate time to this encounter with God, with the world and ourselves. It is a privilege to be able to do these “exercises”! Let our hearts leap in gratitude as we begin our pilgrimage. The One who has loved us from the beginning and leads us in our lives is the One who has brought us here. With this conviction we begin our walk. God who is Father and Mother to us comes to meet us in every person and thing we see. May His presence fill us with gratitude.

Scripture:

Isaiah 55:1-11. God, in his love for me, invites me to come to Him.

Psalm 63. I respond to God by expressing my desire to meet him.

Final Colloquy: Sum up what I have thought about or felt during my prayer, talking to Jesus as one friend does to another. Be frank with him about what you have experienced and felt (or not felt) during this stage of your walk with him.

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 1. Loyola - Zumárraga (18,2 km)

Notes: Let us begin our journey calmly, taking up our subject seriously. It is very useful to spend some time reflecting on the Preparatory Prayer. If you find “depth” in some word or at some point, it is better not to move on, but to remain there, asking what the Spirit is saying and allowing it to speak to us in our heart. Ignatius tells us that “to know and taste something interiorly” is more important than knowing a lot about it.

Ask for the Grace I want: Lord, grant me the grace to feel your love in my life interiorly, and to be profoundly grateful for it.

Reflections: Spirituality has been defined as «turning one’s journey through life into a journey towards God.» We hope to transform our journey through Spain into a spiritual journey.

We begin by contemplating what surrounds us in these beautiful places near Loyola. We walk slowly, aware that it is a gift to be able to dedicate time to this encounter with God, with the world and ourselves. It is a privilege to be able to do these “exercises”! Let our hearts leap in gratitude as we begin our pilgrimage. The One who has loved us from the beginning and leads us in our lives is the One who has brought us here. With this conviction we begin our walk. God who is Father and Mother to us comes to meet us in every person and thing we see. May His presence fill us with gratitude.

Scripture:

Isaiah 55:1-11. God, in his love for me, invites me to come to Him.

Psalm 63. I respond to God by expressing my desire to meet him.

Final Colloquy: Sum up what I have thought about or felt during my prayer, talking to Jesus as one friend does to another. Be frank with him about what you have experienced and felt (or not felt) during this stage of your walk with him.

Etapa 2

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 2. Zumárraga - Arantzazu (21,4 km)

Notes: We insist that it is very useful to devote some time to the introductory prayer, which expresses the fundamental objective of our inner pilgrimage. Remember that if you find “depth” in some word or idea, it is better not to go further, but to remain there, allowing it to talk to us in depth. Today you are recommended to spend a long time in prayer on arrival at Aranzazu sanctuary, just as Ignatius did. Pray with gratitude for everything in your life, for the gifts that you have received up to now and, last but not least, for being here!

Grace: Lord, grant me the grace to feel your love interiorly in my life, with profound thanksgiving.

Reflections: As we approach the sanctuary of our Lady of Aranzazu, we devote a second day to delving prayerfully into the happy points in our life’s story. as you walk and pray recall moments of happiness and grace, especially those you now see as turning points in your life. Were there moments when you particularly felt God’s presence as you made a major choice, or moments in which you endured a major tribulation that you overcame with the help of God? Were there moments when you felt God was absent, times when you could not believe that God could be with you? Nonetheless, He was always there, as your best friend, as a tender Father, as a nurturing Mother. Take into your heart all those moments and feel filled with great gratitude for the persons and events in your past life: God is always at work in our surroundings. Why not present those moments and all those people to God and give thanks that they were His hands and His arms that held you?

Scripture:

Luke 1, 46-55 With Mary, my soul glorifies the Lord.

Luke 12: 22-34 Lord, You know all my needs. I am not to worry.

Final Colloquy: Sum up your meditation in a spirit of prayer, talking to Mary as a son or daughter does to her or his mother. Now that you are close to her shrine, be open with her about what you have discovered during this stage of your journey.

Zumárraga - Arantzazu

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 2. Zumárraga - Arantzazu (21,4 km)

Notes: We insist that it is very useful to devote some time to the introductory prayer, which expresses the fundamental objective of our inner pilgrimage. Remember that if you find “depth” in some word or idea, it is better not to go further, but to remain there, allowing it to talk to us in depth. Today you are recommended to spend a long time in prayer on arrival at Aranzazu sanctuary, just as Ignatius did. Pray with gratitude for everything in your life, for the gifts that you have received up to now and, last but not least, for being here!

Grace: Lord, grant me the grace to feel your love interiorly in my life, with profound thanksgiving.

Reflections: As we approach the sanctuary of our Lady of Aranzazu, we devote a second day to delving prayerfully into the happy points in our life’s story. as you walk and pray recall moments of happiness and grace, especially those you now see as turning points in your life. Were there moments when you particularly felt God’s presence as you made a major choice, or moments in which you endured a major tribulation that you overcame with the help of God? Were there moments when you felt God was absent, times when you could not believe that God could be with you? Nonetheless, He was always there, as your best friend, as a tender Father, as a nurturing Mother. Take into your heart all those moments and feel filled with great gratitude for the persons and events in your past life: God is always at work in our surroundings. Why not present those moments and all those people to God and give thanks that they were His hands and His arms that held you?

Scripture:

Luke 1, 46-55 With Mary, my soul glorifies the Lord.

Luke 12: 22-34 Lord, You know all my needs. I am not to worry.

Final Colloquy: Sum up your meditation in a spirit of prayer, talking to Mary as a son or daughter does to her or his mother. Now that you are close to her shrine, be open with her about what you have discovered during this stage of your journey.

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 2. Zumárraga - Arantzazu (21,4 km)

Notes: We insist that it is very useful to devote some time to the introductory prayer, which expresses the fundamental objective of our inner pilgrimage. Remember that if you find “depth” in some word or idea, it is better not to go further, but to remain there, allowing it to talk to us in depth. Today you are recommended to spend a long time in prayer on arrival at Aranzazu sanctuary, just as Ignatius did. Pray with gratitude for everything in your life, for the gifts that you have received up to now and, last but not least, for being here!

Grace: Lord, grant me the grace to feel your love interiorly in my life, with profound thanksgiving.

Reflections: As we approach the sanctuary of our Lady of Aranzazu, we devote a second day to delving prayerfully into the happy points in our life’s story. as you walk and pray recall moments of happiness and grace, especially those you now see as turning points in your life. Were there moments when you particularly felt God’s presence as you made a major choice, or moments in which you endured a major tribulation that you overcame with the help of God? Were there moments when you felt God was absent, times when you could not believe that God could be with you? Nonetheless, He was always there, as your best friend, as a tender Father, as a nurturing Mother. Take into your heart all those moments and feel filled with great gratitude for the persons and events in your past life: God is always at work in our surroundings. Why not present those moments and all those people to God and give thanks that they were His hands and His arms that held you?

Scripture:

Luke 1, 46-55 With Mary, my soul glorifies the Lord.

Luke 12: 22-34 Lord, You know all my needs. I am not to worry.

Final Colloquy: Sum up your meditation in a spirit of prayer, talking to Mary as a son or daughter does to her or his mother. Now that you are close to her shrine, be open with her about what you have discovered during this stage of your journey.

Etapa 3

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 3. Arantzazu - Araia (18 km)

Notes: We would like to insist on the importance of devoting some time to reflection on the introductory prayer. Remember what Ignatius tells us, that “to know and savour something interiorly” is more important than knowing a lot. So don’t be in a hurry. Today we begin to consider our Principle and Foundation, by reflecting on the purpose for which we were created. An overall vision is essential before going into detail later on.

Grace: Lord, grant me the grace to feel your love internally in my life, with profound thanksgiving. Help me, O Lord, to discover the foundation of my life, according to your will.

Reflections: We begin by recalling that our whole life has been a spiritual journey. As you walk today, devote some time to remembering again your own life story and letting your mind wander over it prayerfully. Recall your past and let God show you a sort of photo album of key moments in it, some painful, others joyful, which have brought you to this present stage of your life. Who am I? How have I reached this point in my life? What people, events or places have been influential in moulding the person I now am? Let these images surface, along with whatever grateful, painful, or prayerful feelings go with them.

In contrast with the good ones, are there moments, people, or aspects of your life that cause feelings of embarrassment, which you want to disown and which you can’t imagine God accepting either. Present those moments to God, with a prayer for acceptance and growth. You don’t have to feel you have become completely reconciled or to “settle” anything today; the people and moments you have recalled and the feelings that have welled up can become matters for consideration and prayer as you walk with God on this pilgrimage. We are experiencing the process of “holding our whole life up to God”, which may at times fill us with joy and gratitude, and at others with regret and shame. The graces we seek will be gratitude, understanding and acceptance of oneself, and realisation that we are accepted by God. Think of yourself as “panning for gold,” sifting through the multitude of ideas that first come up until you find the “nugget”, the aspects of life where you may have something to learn or where you need to grow. God may be leading you to spend time reflecting on them.

Scripture:

Hosea 11,1-9. His love for me is a tender love.

Psalm 139, 1-14.17-18. In awe and reverence I remember how God has cared for me in times of joy and pain, in times of success and failure, in times of faithfulness and infidelity.

Spiritual Exercises, 5. «It is very helpful if those who do the exercises begin them with great courage and generosity towards their Creator and Lord, offering Him all their love and freedom, so that his Divine Majesty may dispose of their person and all they have according to His holy will.»

Final Colloquy: Sum up what has come to mind in your time of prayer, talking to Jesus as one friend does to another. Be honest with him about what you have discovered on this stage of your journey.

Arantzazu - Araia

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 3. Arantzazu - Araia (18 km)

Notes: We would like to insist on the importance of devoting some time to reflection on the introductory prayer. Remember what Ignatius tells us, that “to know and savour something interiorly” is more important than knowing a lot. So don’t be in a hurry. Today we begin to consider our Principle and Foundation, by reflecting on the purpose for which we were created. An overall vision is essential before going into detail later on.

Grace: Lord, grant me the grace to feel your love internally in my life, with profound thanksgiving. Help me, O Lord, to discover the foundation of my life, according to your will.

Reflections: We begin by recalling that our whole life has been a spiritual journey. As you walk today, devote some time to remembering again your own life story and letting your mind wander over it prayerfully. Recall your past and let God show you a sort of photo album of key moments in it, some painful, others joyful, which have brought you to this present stage of your life. Who am I? How have I reached this point in my life? What people, events or places have been influential in moulding the person I now am? Let these images surface, along with whatever grateful, painful, or prayerful feelings go with them.

In contrast with the good ones, are there moments, people, or aspects of your life that cause feelings of embarrassment, which you want to disown and which you can’t imagine God accepting either. Present those moments to God, with a prayer for acceptance and growth. You don’t have to feel you have become completely reconciled or to “settle” anything today; the people and moments you have recalled and the feelings that have welled up can become matters for consideration and prayer as you walk with God on this pilgrimage. We are experiencing the process of “holding our whole life up to God”, which may at times fill us with joy and gratitude, and at others with regret and shame. The graces we seek will be gratitude, understanding and acceptance of oneself, and realisation that we are accepted by God. Think of yourself as “panning for gold,” sifting through the multitude of ideas that first come up until you find the “nugget”, the aspects of life where you may have something to learn or where you need to grow. God may be leading you to spend time reflecting on them.

Scripture:

Hosea 11,1-9. His love for me is a tender love.

Psalm 139, 1-14.17-18. In awe and reverence I remember how God has cared for me in times of joy and pain, in times of success and failure, in times of faithfulness and infidelity.

Spiritual Exercises, 5. «It is very helpful if those who do the exercises begin them with great courage and generosity towards their Creator and Lord, offering Him all their love and freedom, so that his Divine Majesty may dispose of their person and all they have according to His holy will.»

Final Colloquy: Sum up what has come to mind in your time of prayer, talking to Jesus as one friend does to another. Be honest with him about what you have discovered on this stage of your journey.

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 3. Arantzazu - Araia (18 km)

Notes: We would like to insist on the importance of devoting some time to reflection on the introductory prayer. Remember what Ignatius tells us, that “to know and savour something interiorly” is more important than knowing a lot. So don’t be in a hurry. Today we begin to consider our Principle and Foundation, by reflecting on the purpose for which we were created. An overall vision is essential before going into detail later on.

Grace: Lord, grant me the grace to feel your love internally in my life, with profound thanksgiving. Help me, O Lord, to discover the foundation of my life, according to your will.

Reflections: We begin by recalling that our whole life has been a spiritual journey. As you walk today, devote some time to remembering again your own life story and letting your mind wander over it prayerfully. Recall your past and let God show you a sort of photo album of key moments in it, some painful, others joyful, which have brought you to this present stage of your life. Who am I? How have I reached this point in my life? What people, events or places have been influential in moulding the person I now am? Let these images surface, along with whatever grateful, painful, or prayerful feelings go with them.

In contrast with the good ones, are there moments, people, or aspects of your life that cause feelings of embarrassment, which you want to disown and which you can’t imagine God accepting either. Present those moments to God, with a prayer for acceptance and growth. You don’t have to feel you have become completely reconciled or to “settle” anything today; the people and moments you have recalled and the feelings that have welled up can become matters for consideration and prayer as you walk with God on this pilgrimage. We are experiencing the process of “holding our whole life up to God”, which may at times fill us with joy and gratitude, and at others with regret and shame. The graces we seek will be gratitude, understanding and acceptance of oneself, and realisation that we are accepted by God. Think of yourself as “panning for gold,” sifting through the multitude of ideas that first come up until you find the “nugget”, the aspects of life where you may have something to learn or where you need to grow. God may be leading you to spend time reflecting on them.

Scripture:

Hosea 11,1-9. His love for me is a tender love.

Psalm 139, 1-14.17-18. In awe and reverence I remember how God has cared for me in times of joy and pain, in times of success and failure, in times of faithfulness and infidelity.

Spiritual Exercises, 5. «It is very helpful if those who do the exercises begin them with great courage and generosity towards their Creator and Lord, offering Him all their love and freedom, so that his Divine Majesty may dispose of their person and all they have according to His holy will.»

Final Colloquy: Sum up what has come to mind in your time of prayer, talking to Jesus as one friend does to another. Be honest with him about what you have discovered on this stage of your journey.

Etapa 4

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 4. Araia - Alda (22 km)

Notes: We insist again on the need to devote some time to reflection on the introductory prayer. Remember as well what Ignatius tells us — that “inner knowledge and inner savour” are more important than knowing much. So don’t be in a hurry. Today we continue our consideration of our Principle and Foundation.

Grace: I beseech you, Lord, to direct all my actions by Your inspiration, to carry them on by Your gracious help, so that every intention and operation of mine may begin always from You and through You be happily ended.

Reflections: The previous meditations reminded you where you have been in your life and that God has been and always will remain a faithful presence in your life journey. Today our meditation shifts focus. We reflect on the wider panorama, the bigger and fuller picture of your life, the meaning of our human journey through life. What is God’s plan for us humans? What is the purpose of our pilgrimage through this world? In the Spiritual Exercises, Ignatius gives a straightforward yet profound answer to those questions: “God created us to praise reverence and serve Him and in this way to save our souls. God created all other creatures to help us achieve this purposes.”

This statement is simple yet profound. God created us for union with Him (to “save our souls,” as Ignatius puts it). In this earthly life, we draw close to God by praise and gratitude for the wonders of this planet, by reverencing and showing deep respect for the persons and gifts God has created, and by serving God in our fellow men and women.

I attain full spiritual freedom when I am seized so completely by the love of God that all the desires of my heart and every action, affection, thought and decision which flows from them are directed to God my Father/Mother and His service and praise.

We begin by reflecting on the purpose of our lives: we know what a coffeemaker is for. What are human beings for?

Scripture:

Psalm 104. The God who calls me is the God who created me and who made everything else because He loves me.

Genesis 22:1-18. This text about Abraham’s faith and freedom questions my own faith and freedom.

Mark 12:28-34. My Principle and Foundation is the Love of God.

Final Colloquy: Sum up what has come to mind in your time of prayer, talking to Jesus as one friend does to another. Be honest with him about what you have discovered on this stage of your journey.

 

Araia - Alda

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 4. Araia - Alda (22 km)

Notes: We insist again on the need to devote some time to reflection on the introductory prayer. Remember as well what Ignatius tells us — that “inner knowledge and inner savour” are more important than knowing much. So don’t be in a hurry. Today we continue our consideration of our Principle and Foundation.

Grace: I beseech you, Lord, to direct all my actions by Your inspiration, to carry them on by Your gracious help, so that every intention and operation of mine may begin always from You and through You be happily ended.

Reflections: The previous meditations reminded you where you have been in your life and that God has been and always will remain a faithful presence in your life journey. Today our meditation shifts focus. We reflect on the wider panorama, the bigger and fuller picture of your life, the meaning of our human journey through life. What is God’s plan for us humans? What is the purpose of our pilgrimage through this world? In the Spiritual Exercises, Ignatius gives a straightforward yet profound answer to those questions: “God created us to praise reverence and serve Him and in this way to save our souls. God created all other creatures to help us achieve this purposes.”

This statement is simple yet profound. God created us for union with Him (to “save our souls,” as Ignatius puts it). In this earthly life, we draw close to God by praise and gratitude for the wonders of this planet, by reverencing and showing deep respect for the persons and gifts God has created, and by serving God in our fellow men and women.

I attain full spiritual freedom when I am seized so completely by the love of God that all the desires of my heart and every action, affection, thought and decision which flows from them are directed to God my Father/Mother and His service and praise.

We begin by reflecting on the purpose of our lives: we know what a coffeemaker is for. What are human beings for?

Scripture:

Psalm 104. The God who calls me is the God who created me and who made everything else because He loves me.

Genesis 22:1-18. This text about Abraham’s faith and freedom questions my own faith and freedom.

Mark 12:28-34. My Principle and Foundation is the Love of God.

Final Colloquy: Sum up what has come to mind in your time of prayer, talking to Jesus as one friend does to another. Be honest with him about what you have discovered on this stage of your journey.

 

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 4. Araia - Alda (22 km)

Notes: We insist again on the need to devote some time to reflection on the introductory prayer. Remember as well what Ignatius tells us — that “inner knowledge and inner savour” are more important than knowing much. So don’t be in a hurry. Today we continue our consideration of our Principle and Foundation.

Grace: I beseech you, Lord, to direct all my actions by Your inspiration, to carry them on by Your gracious help, so that every intention and operation of mine may begin always from You and through You be happily ended.

Reflections: The previous meditations reminded you where you have been in your life and that God has been and always will remain a faithful presence in your life journey. Today our meditation shifts focus. We reflect on the wider panorama, the bigger and fuller picture of your life, the meaning of our human journey through life. What is God’s plan for us humans? What is the purpose of our pilgrimage through this world? In the Spiritual Exercises, Ignatius gives a straightforward yet profound answer to those questions: “God created us to praise reverence and serve Him and in this way to save our souls. God created all other creatures to help us achieve this purposes.”

This statement is simple yet profound. God created us for union with Him (to “save our souls,” as Ignatius puts it). In this earthly life, we draw close to God by praise and gratitude for the wonders of this planet, by reverencing and showing deep respect for the persons and gifts God has created, and by serving God in our fellow men and women.

I attain full spiritual freedom when I am seized so completely by the love of God that all the desires of my heart and every action, affection, thought and decision which flows from them are directed to God my Father/Mother and His service and praise.

We begin by reflecting on the purpose of our lives: we know what a coffeemaker is for. What are human beings for?

Scripture:

Psalm 104. The God who calls me is the God who created me and who made everything else because He loves me.

Genesis 22:1-18. This text about Abraham’s faith and freedom questions my own faith and freedom.

Mark 12:28-34. My Principle and Foundation is the Love of God.

Final Colloquy: Sum up what has come to mind in your time of prayer, talking to Jesus as one friend does to another. Be honest with him about what you have discovered on this stage of your journey.

 

Etapa 5

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 5. Alda - Genevilla (18,5 km)

Notes: We know already that it is very important to reflect on the introductory prayer. We should also bear in mind that we should not be in a hurry while meditating. Today we want to consider all the “means” that God employs to show us His Love, and the use to which we should put these “means”.

Grace: I beseech you, Lord, to direct all my actions by Your inspiration, to carry them on by Your gracious help, so that every intention and operation of mine may begin always from You and through You be happily ended.

Reflections: Today we reflect further on our human life and how to live in order to achieve its purpose well. Specifically we consider more deeply this sentence from the Exercises of St Ignatius: «The other things on the face of the earth were created for humans, to help them in pursuing the end for which they were created.» Here’s how Ignatius reveals some of the challenging implications of that sentence: «We ought to use these things to the extent that they help us towards our end, and free ourselves from them to the extent that they hinder us from it. To attain this it is necessary to make ourselves indifferent to all created things, so that we do not to seek wealth rather than poverty, honor rather than dishonor, a long life rather than a short one, and so on. Rather, we ought to desire and choose only that which is most conducive to the end for which we were created.»

Being ‘indifferent,’ in Ignatius’s words, means being ‘free’: that is we are free from being so attached, addicted, enslaved or bewitched by any created or merely human thing that it gets in the way of living according to our purpose. That is, we do not want to become so obsessed with living a successful earthly life that our life becomes about serving ourselves and not serving God and following His plan. We want to be free from anything that could prevent us from being free for our true purpose. We want to put the love of God above any merely human love. We want to live a balanced, ordered life: a life in which we have a proper relationship with other persons, with money and with things, so that we don’t become enslaved by an attachment to any of them. While created things can help us achieve our purpose, they can also distract us from it if we become focused on them rather than on our greater purpose. We shouldn’t confuse earthly ambitions with the purpose of life and allow them to take the place of God.

Make a list of people you admire in this regard. What is it that you admire in them? Maybe you can picture holy people of the past or people you know now, whose lives show this healthy balance and freedom. This is not the time to judge yourself on where you may be falling short (you will reflect on your own performance later). For the moment, we are trying to develop a clear sense of purpose, and a clear sense of the ideals we want to aspire to in our life.

Scripture:

Psalm 8. What is a frail human, that you should be mindful of him?

Romans 8: 5-6; 12-18. All who are led by the Spirit of God are children of God. Those who live according to the Spirit set their minds on the things of the Spirit.

Philippians 1:21-26; 3:7-16; 4:10-13. Here and now, how closely can I identify with the attitude of Saint Paul?

Final Colloquy: Sum up what has come to mind in your time of prayer, talking to Jesus as one friend does to another. Be honest with him about what you have discovered on this stage of your journey.

Alda - Genevilla

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 5. Alda - Genevilla (18,5 km)

Notes: We know already that it is very important to reflect on the introductory prayer. We should also bear in mind that we should not be in a hurry while meditating. Today we want to consider all the “means” that God employs to show us His Love, and the use to which we should put these “means”.

Grace: I beseech you, Lord, to direct all my actions by Your inspiration, to carry them on by Your gracious help, so that every intention and operation of mine may begin always from You and through You be happily ended.

Reflections: Today we reflect further on our human life and how to live in order to achieve its purpose well. Specifically we consider more deeply this sentence from the Exercises of St Ignatius: «The other things on the face of the earth were created for humans, to help them in pursuing the end for which they were created.» Here’s how Ignatius reveals some of the challenging implications of that sentence: «We ought to use these things to the extent that they help us towards our end, and free ourselves from them to the extent that they hinder us from it. To attain this it is necessary to make ourselves indifferent to all created things, so that we do not to seek wealth rather than poverty, honor rather than dishonor, a long life rather than a short one, and so on. Rather, we ought to desire and choose only that which is most conducive to the end for which we were created.»

Being ‘indifferent,’ in Ignatius’s words, means being ‘free’: that is we are free from being so attached, addicted, enslaved or bewitched by any created or merely human thing that it gets in the way of living according to our purpose. That is, we do not want to become so obsessed with living a successful earthly life that our life becomes about serving ourselves and not serving God and following His plan. We want to be free from anything that could prevent us from being free for our true purpose. We want to put the love of God above any merely human love. We want to live a balanced, ordered life: a life in which we have a proper relationship with other persons, with money and with things, so that we don’t become enslaved by an attachment to any of them. While created things can help us achieve our purpose, they can also distract us from it if we become focused on them rather than on our greater purpose. We shouldn’t confuse earthly ambitions with the purpose of life and allow them to take the place of God.

Make a list of people you admire in this regard. What is it that you admire in them? Maybe you can picture holy people of the past or people you know now, whose lives show this healthy balance and freedom. This is not the time to judge yourself on where you may be falling short (you will reflect on your own performance later). For the moment, we are trying to develop a clear sense of purpose, and a clear sense of the ideals we want to aspire to in our life.

Scripture:

Psalm 8. What is a frail human, that you should be mindful of him?

Romans 8: 5-6; 12-18. All who are led by the Spirit of God are children of God. Those who live according to the Spirit set their minds on the things of the Spirit.

Philippians 1:21-26; 3:7-16; 4:10-13. Here and now, how closely can I identify with the attitude of Saint Paul?

Final Colloquy: Sum up what has come to mind in your time of prayer, talking to Jesus as one friend does to another. Be honest with him about what you have discovered on this stage of your journey.

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 5. Alda - Genevilla (18,5 km)

Notes: We know already that it is very important to reflect on the introductory prayer. We should also bear in mind that we should not be in a hurry while meditating. Today we want to consider all the “means” that God employs to show us His Love, and the use to which we should put these “means”.

Grace: I beseech you, Lord, to direct all my actions by Your inspiration, to carry them on by Your gracious help, so that every intention and operation of mine may begin always from You and through You be happily ended.

Reflections: Today we reflect further on our human life and how to live in order to achieve its purpose well. Specifically we consider more deeply this sentence from the Exercises of St Ignatius: «The other things on the face of the earth were created for humans, to help them in pursuing the end for which they were created.» Here’s how Ignatius reveals some of the challenging implications of that sentence: «We ought to use these things to the extent that they help us towards our end, and free ourselves from them to the extent that they hinder us from it. To attain this it is necessary to make ourselves indifferent to all created things, so that we do not to seek wealth rather than poverty, honor rather than dishonor, a long life rather than a short one, and so on. Rather, we ought to desire and choose only that which is most conducive to the end for which we were created.»

Being ‘indifferent,’ in Ignatius’s words, means being ‘free’: that is we are free from being so attached, addicted, enslaved or bewitched by any created or merely human thing that it gets in the way of living according to our purpose. That is, we do not want to become so obsessed with living a successful earthly life that our life becomes about serving ourselves and not serving God and following His plan. We want to be free from anything that could prevent us from being free for our true purpose. We want to put the love of God above any merely human love. We want to live a balanced, ordered life: a life in which we have a proper relationship with other persons, with money and with things, so that we don’t become enslaved by an attachment to any of them. While created things can help us achieve our purpose, they can also distract us from it if we become focused on them rather than on our greater purpose. We shouldn’t confuse earthly ambitions with the purpose of life and allow them to take the place of God.

Make a list of people you admire in this regard. What is it that you admire in them? Maybe you can picture holy people of the past or people you know now, whose lives show this healthy balance and freedom. This is not the time to judge yourself on where you may be falling short (you will reflect on your own performance later). For the moment, we are trying to develop a clear sense of purpose, and a clear sense of the ideals we want to aspire to in our life.

Scripture:

Psalm 8. What is a frail human, that you should be mindful of him?

Romans 8: 5-6; 12-18. All who are led by the Spirit of God are children of God. Those who live according to the Spirit set their minds on the things of the Spirit.

Philippians 1:21-26; 3:7-16; 4:10-13. Here and now, how closely can I identify with the attitude of Saint Paul?

Final Colloquy: Sum up what has come to mind in your time of prayer, talking to Jesus as one friend does to another. Be honest with him about what you have discovered on this stage of your journey.

Etapa 6

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 6. Genevilla – Laguardia (27.3 km)

Notes: Today we begin to consider the presence of evil in our lives. We are called to feel the pain of our sinful ways. It is a “gloomy day”’, when we discover that serious reality. Ignatius asks us to be in that mood during our meditation, our walk, our day. The Jesuits have defined themselves as follows: «What is it to be a Jesuit? It is to know that one is a sinner, yet called to be a companion of Jesus as Ignatius was. What is it to be a companion of Jesus today? It is to engage, under the standard of the Cross, in the crucial struggle of our time: the struggle for faith and the struggle for justice which it includes. » (General Congregation 32:11-12)

Grace: Aware of the end for which I was created and of the call which God makes to me, I beg Him for a deeply felt understanding of my sins and of the disordered tendencies in my life, so that I may feel shame and confusion, and turn to Him for healing and forgiveness.

Reflections: We have been reflecting on God’s plan for humans and the harmony that results when our relationships with other people and the world are in good order. Today we reflect on the reality of sin: that is that there is gross disorder in our world. Sin is not just an accident or a mistake. Rather, sin means that people are deliberately choosing to bring disorder and chaos into their own and others’ lives because of some gross attachment: the salesperson who cheats customers to enrich himself, the pimp who sells children into sex slavery, the government official who steals money and allows citizens to live in squalor, the spouse whose children don’t get the love they deserve, the politician who lies and cheats for the sake of power…..

Reflect today not so much on your own personal history as a sinner (that will be tomorrow), but on the harsh, cruel reality of sin in our world and the disorder, pain, and chaos it causes. Sin has consequences. Reflect as well on the reality of Christ hanging on the cross, an image that is enshrined at the centre, above the altar in every Catholic Church. Christ entered history and suffered in response to human sinfulness, to redeem humans and show them a better path. Try to appreciate what our culture has lost today: an awareness of the reality of sin. Call to mind images of our World in Pain, suffering because of the injustice that is at work in nearly every relationship and human interchange. Go through the economic crisis and its causes. Think of the roots of sin and selfishness in the World. As you walk along, pray to have a clear vision of the Sin at work without shame in our lives. And pray that you will feel the disorder in your own life and the shame of it.

Scripture:

Jeremiah 18:1-10. The clay vessel he was making was spoiled in the potter’s hand, and he reworked it into another vessel.

1 John 1:5-2:2. If we say, “We are without sin,” we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. But if we acknowledge our sins, he who is faithful and just will forgive our sins and cleanse us from every wrongdoing.

Final Colloquy: «Imagining Christ our Lord before me nailed to the Cross, to ask why the Creator became man and from eternal life came to temporal death, so as to die for my sins. Likewise, looking at myself, ask what I have done for Christ, what I am doing for Christ, what I should do for Christ; and seeing Him like this hanging on the cross, I reflect on what occurs to me. The Conversation/Prayer is made speaking as one friend speaks to another, or a servant to his Master, asking for some grace, or blaming myself for some wrong, or bringing my concerns before Him and asking for advice about them. Conclude by saying an Our Father

Genevilla – Laguardia

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 6. Genevilla – Laguardia (27.3 km)

Notes: Today we begin to consider the presence of evil in our lives. We are called to feel the pain of our sinful ways. It is a “gloomy day”’, when we discover that serious reality. Ignatius asks us to be in that mood during our meditation, our walk, our day. The Jesuits have defined themselves as follows: «What is it to be a Jesuit? It is to know that one is a sinner, yet called to be a companion of Jesus as Ignatius was. What is it to be a companion of Jesus today? It is to engage, under the standard of the Cross, in the crucial struggle of our time: the struggle for faith and the struggle for justice which it includes. » (General Congregation 32:11-12)

Grace: Aware of the end for which I was created and of the call which God makes to me, I beg Him for a deeply felt understanding of my sins and of the disordered tendencies in my life, so that I may feel shame and confusion, and turn to Him for healing and forgiveness.

Reflections: We have been reflecting on God’s plan for humans and the harmony that results when our relationships with other people and the world are in good order. Today we reflect on the reality of sin: that is that there is gross disorder in our world. Sin is not just an accident or a mistake. Rather, sin means that people are deliberately choosing to bring disorder and chaos into their own and others’ lives because of some gross attachment: the salesperson who cheats customers to enrich himself, the pimp who sells children into sex slavery, the government official who steals money and allows citizens to live in squalor, the spouse whose children don’t get the love they deserve, the politician who lies and cheats for the sake of power…..

Reflect today not so much on your own personal history as a sinner (that will be tomorrow), but on the harsh, cruel reality of sin in our world and the disorder, pain, and chaos it causes. Sin has consequences. Reflect as well on the reality of Christ hanging on the cross, an image that is enshrined at the centre, above the altar in every Catholic Church. Christ entered history and suffered in response to human sinfulness, to redeem humans and show them a better path. Try to appreciate what our culture has lost today: an awareness of the reality of sin. Call to mind images of our World in Pain, suffering because of the injustice that is at work in nearly every relationship and human interchange. Go through the economic crisis and its causes. Think of the roots of sin and selfishness in the World. As you walk along, pray to have a clear vision of the Sin at work without shame in our lives. And pray that you will feel the disorder in your own life and the shame of it.

Scripture:

Jeremiah 18:1-10. The clay vessel he was making was spoiled in the potter’s hand, and he reworked it into another vessel.

1 John 1:5-2:2. If we say, “We are without sin,” we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. But if we acknowledge our sins, he who is faithful and just will forgive our sins and cleanse us from every wrongdoing.

Final Colloquy: «Imagining Christ our Lord before me nailed to the Cross, to ask why the Creator became man and from eternal life came to temporal death, so as to die for my sins. Likewise, looking at myself, ask what I have done for Christ, what I am doing for Christ, what I should do for Christ; and seeing Him like this hanging on the cross, I reflect on what occurs to me. The Conversation/Prayer is made speaking as one friend speaks to another, or a servant to his Master, asking for some grace, or blaming myself for some wrong, or bringing my concerns before Him and asking for advice about them. Conclude by saying an Our Father

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 6. Genevilla – Laguardia (27.3 km)

Notes: Today we begin to consider the presence of evil in our lives. We are called to feel the pain of our sinful ways. It is a “gloomy day”’, when we discover that serious reality. Ignatius asks us to be in that mood during our meditation, our walk, our day. The Jesuits have defined themselves as follows: «What is it to be a Jesuit? It is to know that one is a sinner, yet called to be a companion of Jesus as Ignatius was. What is it to be a companion of Jesus today? It is to engage, under the standard of the Cross, in the crucial struggle of our time: the struggle for faith and the struggle for justice which it includes. » (General Congregation 32:11-12)

Grace: Aware of the end for which I was created and of the call which God makes to me, I beg Him for a deeply felt understanding of my sins and of the disordered tendencies in my life, so that I may feel shame and confusion, and turn to Him for healing and forgiveness.

Reflections: We have been reflecting on God’s plan for humans and the harmony that results when our relationships with other people and the world are in good order. Today we reflect on the reality of sin: that is that there is gross disorder in our world. Sin is not just an accident or a mistake. Rather, sin means that people are deliberately choosing to bring disorder and chaos into their own and others’ lives because of some gross attachment: the salesperson who cheats customers to enrich himself, the pimp who sells children into sex slavery, the government official who steals money and allows citizens to live in squalor, the spouse whose children don’t get the love they deserve, the politician who lies and cheats for the sake of power…..

Reflect today not so much on your own personal history as a sinner (that will be tomorrow), but on the harsh, cruel reality of sin in our world and the disorder, pain, and chaos it causes. Sin has consequences. Reflect as well on the reality of Christ hanging on the cross, an image that is enshrined at the centre, above the altar in every Catholic Church. Christ entered history and suffered in response to human sinfulness, to redeem humans and show them a better path. Try to appreciate what our culture has lost today: an awareness of the reality of sin. Call to mind images of our World in Pain, suffering because of the injustice that is at work in nearly every relationship and human interchange. Go through the economic crisis and its causes. Think of the roots of sin and selfishness in the World. As you walk along, pray to have a clear vision of the Sin at work without shame in our lives. And pray that you will feel the disorder in your own life and the shame of it.

Scripture:

Jeremiah 18:1-10. The clay vessel he was making was spoiled in the potter’s hand, and he reworked it into another vessel.

1 John 1:5-2:2. If we say, “We are without sin,” we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. But if we acknowledge our sins, he who is faithful and just will forgive our sins and cleanse us from every wrongdoing.

Final Colloquy: «Imagining Christ our Lord before me nailed to the Cross, to ask why the Creator became man and from eternal life came to temporal death, so as to die for my sins. Likewise, looking at myself, ask what I have done for Christ, what I am doing for Christ, what I should do for Christ; and seeing Him like this hanging on the cross, I reflect on what occurs to me. The Conversation/Prayer is made speaking as one friend speaks to another, or a servant to his Master, asking for some grace, or blaming myself for some wrong, or bringing my concerns before Him and asking for advice about them. Conclude by saying an Our Father

Etapa 7

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 7. Laguardia – Navarrete (19,6 km)

Notes: We continue considering the presence of evil in life, but now we look at the evil in our own lives. We try to become aware of our own faults. Ignatius advises us to keep a “gloomy day”, as an aid to discovering the sin in our lives and experiencing its reality. So we maintain that “sad mood” for meditation, to help us get better into this consideration of evil.

Grace: Having become aware of the purpose for which I was created and of the vocation to which God invites me, I beg Him for a deeply felt understanding of  the sin in me and of the disordered tendencies in my life, so that I may feel shame and confusion, and  turn to Him for healing and forgiveness.

Reflections: Yesterday we prayed for the grace of a deeper understanding of the reality of a sinful world. Today we take on another uncomfortable, awkward reality: My own sin. That we are sinners is true not only of reprobate criminals but each of us is a sinner, starting with the Pope down to whatever disgraced reprobate occupies this morning’s news. Each of us has habitual patterns of rebellion against God’s plan: what are mine? One psalm declares, “The Lord hears the cry of the poor.” What about me? Are there ways in which I have habitually not listened to “those in need” who have crossed my path: the poor, elderly, unpopular, marginalized, etc.? Have there been ways in which I have used or abused other persons in order to satisfy my own need for attention, money, sex, approval, comfort?

Today we seek the grace of understanding our own sinfulness. Too often, our culture “anesthetizes” us from taking responsibility for our own false way of thinking and our wrongdoing. Aristotle once declared that the “unexamined life is not worth living.” We need to scrutinize our shortcomings and habitual failings: the pockets of darkness in our lives, the habits which have become “normal”. The ones which drag us down and hold us back from living in proper relationship with God, others and God’s world. We might pray to God for the courage to discover our blind spots, to confront ourselves and our sinfulness, in order to abhor it.

Be sure to talk to God and Jesus. To feel abandoned in our sin is exactly the opposite of the grace we seek for this day. Our sinfulness should not leave us wallowing in self-pity or depressed; rather, we pray for exactly the opposite grace—a sense of wonder and gratitude that I am a “sinner who is loved,” so loved by God that He gave His only begotten Son for me, so loved that, although He knows fully the extent of my sins, His love remains undimmed and His desire for partnership and friendship with me is utterly unchanged. Ignatius invites me to experience genuine shame for my sinfulness, coupled with great wonder that I am still here and alive: the wonder that I am a sinner but also loved and redeemed. I seek an inner healing, knowing that I am a sinner who is loved.

Scripture:

Luke 15:1-7. Jesus receives sinners and eats with them.

Luke 5:1-11. I say to Jesus: Depart from me, Lord, for I am a sinner!

2Cor 12:8-10. When I am weak, then I am strong.

Final Colloquy: «Imagining Christ our Lord before me, hanging on a cross, speak to Him, asking Him how the Creator became man for me, and came from eternal life to temporal death, and so died for my sins. Likewise, looking at myself, ask what I have done for Christ, what I am doing for Christ, what I should do for Christ; and so, seeing Him like this, hanging on the cross, discuss what occurs to me. The dialogue is held as one friend speaks to another, or a servant to his Master; sometimes asking for some grace, sometimes blaming myself for some wrong, sometimes discussing my affairs and asking advice about them. Conclude by saying an Our Father. »

Laguardia – Navarrete

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 7. Laguardia – Navarrete (19,6 km)

Notes: We continue considering the presence of evil in life, but now we look at the evil in our own lives. We try to become aware of our own faults. Ignatius advises us to keep a “gloomy day”, as an aid to discovering the sin in our lives and experiencing its reality. So we maintain that “sad mood” for meditation, to help us get better into this consideration of evil.

Grace: Having become aware of the purpose for which I was created and of the vocation to which God invites me, I beg Him for a deeply felt understanding of  the sin in me and of the disordered tendencies in my life, so that I may feel shame and confusion, and  turn to Him for healing and forgiveness.

Reflections: Yesterday we prayed for the grace of a deeper understanding of the reality of a sinful world. Today we take on another uncomfortable, awkward reality: My own sin. That we are sinners is true not only of reprobate criminals but each of us is a sinner, starting with the Pope down to whatever disgraced reprobate occupies this morning’s news. Each of us has habitual patterns of rebellion against God’s plan: what are mine? One psalm declares, “The Lord hears the cry of the poor.” What about me? Are there ways in which I have habitually not listened to “those in need” who have crossed my path: the poor, elderly, unpopular, marginalized, etc.? Have there been ways in which I have used or abused other persons in order to satisfy my own need for attention, money, sex, approval, comfort?

Today we seek the grace of understanding our own sinfulness. Too often, our culture “anesthetizes” us from taking responsibility for our own false way of thinking and our wrongdoing. Aristotle once declared that the “unexamined life is not worth living.” We need to scrutinize our shortcomings and habitual failings: the pockets of darkness in our lives, the habits which have become “normal”. The ones which drag us down and hold us back from living in proper relationship with God, others and God’s world. We might pray to God for the courage to discover our blind spots, to confront ourselves and our sinfulness, in order to abhor it.

Be sure to talk to God and Jesus. To feel abandoned in our sin is exactly the opposite of the grace we seek for this day. Our sinfulness should not leave us wallowing in self-pity or depressed; rather, we pray for exactly the opposite grace—a sense of wonder and gratitude that I am a “sinner who is loved,” so loved by God that He gave His only begotten Son for me, so loved that, although He knows fully the extent of my sins, His love remains undimmed and His desire for partnership and friendship with me is utterly unchanged. Ignatius invites me to experience genuine shame for my sinfulness, coupled with great wonder that I am still here and alive: the wonder that I am a sinner but also loved and redeemed. I seek an inner healing, knowing that I am a sinner who is loved.

Scripture:

Luke 15:1-7. Jesus receives sinners and eats with them.

Luke 5:1-11. I say to Jesus: Depart from me, Lord, for I am a sinner!

2Cor 12:8-10. When I am weak, then I am strong.

Final Colloquy: «Imagining Christ our Lord before me, hanging on a cross, speak to Him, asking Him how the Creator became man for me, and came from eternal life to temporal death, and so died for my sins. Likewise, looking at myself, ask what I have done for Christ, what I am doing for Christ, what I should do for Christ; and so, seeing Him like this, hanging on the cross, discuss what occurs to me. The dialogue is held as one friend speaks to another, or a servant to his Master; sometimes asking for some grace, sometimes blaming myself for some wrong, sometimes discussing my affairs and asking advice about them. Conclude by saying an Our Father. »

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 7. Laguardia – Navarrete (19,6 km)

Notes: We continue considering the presence of evil in life, but now we look at the evil in our own lives. We try to become aware of our own faults. Ignatius advises us to keep a “gloomy day”, as an aid to discovering the sin in our lives and experiencing its reality. So we maintain that “sad mood” for meditation, to help us get better into this consideration of evil.

Grace: Having become aware of the purpose for which I was created and of the vocation to which God invites me, I beg Him for a deeply felt understanding of  the sin in me and of the disordered tendencies in my life, so that I may feel shame and confusion, and  turn to Him for healing and forgiveness.

Reflections: Yesterday we prayed for the grace of a deeper understanding of the reality of a sinful world. Today we take on another uncomfortable, awkward reality: My own sin. That we are sinners is true not only of reprobate criminals but each of us is a sinner, starting with the Pope down to whatever disgraced reprobate occupies this morning’s news. Each of us has habitual patterns of rebellion against God’s plan: what are mine? One psalm declares, “The Lord hears the cry of the poor.” What about me? Are there ways in which I have habitually not listened to “those in need” who have crossed my path: the poor, elderly, unpopular, marginalized, etc.? Have there been ways in which I have used or abused other persons in order to satisfy my own need for attention, money, sex, approval, comfort?

Today we seek the grace of understanding our own sinfulness. Too often, our culture “anesthetizes” us from taking responsibility for our own false way of thinking and our wrongdoing. Aristotle once declared that the “unexamined life is not worth living.” We need to scrutinize our shortcomings and habitual failings: the pockets of darkness in our lives, the habits which have become “normal”. The ones which drag us down and hold us back from living in proper relationship with God, others and God’s world. We might pray to God for the courage to discover our blind spots, to confront ourselves and our sinfulness, in order to abhor it.

Be sure to talk to God and Jesus. To feel abandoned in our sin is exactly the opposite of the grace we seek for this day. Our sinfulness should not leave us wallowing in self-pity or depressed; rather, we pray for exactly the opposite grace—a sense of wonder and gratitude that I am a “sinner who is loved,” so loved by God that He gave His only begotten Son for me, so loved that, although He knows fully the extent of my sins, His love remains undimmed and His desire for partnership and friendship with me is utterly unchanged. Ignatius invites me to experience genuine shame for my sinfulness, coupled with great wonder that I am still here and alive: the wonder that I am a sinner but also loved and redeemed. I seek an inner healing, knowing that I am a sinner who is loved.

Scripture:

Luke 15:1-7. Jesus receives sinners and eats with them.

Luke 5:1-11. I say to Jesus: Depart from me, Lord, for I am a sinner!

2Cor 12:8-10. When I am weak, then I am strong.

Final Colloquy: «Imagining Christ our Lord before me, hanging on a cross, speak to Him, asking Him how the Creator became man for me, and came from eternal life to temporal death, and so died for my sins. Likewise, looking at myself, ask what I have done for Christ, what I am doing for Christ, what I should do for Christ; and so, seeing Him like this, hanging on the cross, discuss what occurs to me. The dialogue is held as one friend speaks to another, or a servant to his Master; sometimes asking for some grace, sometimes blaming myself for some wrong, sometimes discussing my affairs and asking advice about them. Conclude by saying an Our Father. »

Etapa 8

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 8. Navarrete – Logroño (13 km)

Notes: We are still considering the presence of evil in our lives, but today in an entirely different way. We now open ourselves to the mercy of our Father. Ignatius invites us to experience the wonder to be felt when, in spite of the reality of our own sin, we come face to face with the infinite mercy of God. Today our attitude on our Walk is that of a repentant sinner, but above all of a sinner who is immensely loved.

Grace: Dear Father, I ask you for the gift of an interior, felt knowledge of my sinfulness so that I may experience also your love for me, as well as a growing desire to turn towards you and a renewed enthusiasm for following Jesus.

Reflections: You have reflected on the reality of human sin and your own sinfulness. Today you are invited to reflect on the awesome reality of God’s mercy. You are loved and forgiven, completely. “Repent and believe the Good News.” The two go hand in hand. That is, we first accept the reality of our sinfulness and repent truly that we have brought disharmony and disorder to our own life and to the world. We then believe the Good News: God is merciful, always has been and always will be. What ultimately matters is not that we are faithful to God (none of us is capable of complete fidelity) but that God is faithful to us. It is the same God who accompanies you: at your best moments, when you behave well and earn praise from all sides and at you most shameful moments, when you know there is good reason for you to be disgraced. You cannot earn God’s love, and you do not have to! God’s love is freely given, so freely given that seems impossible to us! The father in the parable, though he has every reason to be angry, harbors no resentment. His younger son has offended him and squandered what he worked so hard to accumulate, a thing we humans find almost impossible to accept. Indeed, the elder son cannot accept the forgiving attitude of the father.

In your life as sinner, you are not alone. You are forgiven. You are loved. And this is what drives us to repentance, to the desire to make amends. But we must know that we need God’s grace to repent and desire to do so: we do not know and follow the right way by our own wisdom and strength. Ask Jesus. Pray that you may be willing and able to accept fully what God offers so freely: forgiveness. We humans often go through life saddled with crippling guilt. God asks us instead to walk in freedom.

Scripture:

Luke 15: 11-32. This son of mine was dead and has come back to life; he was lost and is found.

Luke 5: 17-26. When Jesus saw their faith he said (to the paralytic), “Your sins are forgiven.”

John 8: 2-11. And Jesus said, “Neither do I condemn you. Go, and do not sin again.”

Romans 5: 1-8. God shows his love for us in that while we were still sinners Christ died for us.

Final Colloquy: I talk to Jesus as one friend does to another, experiencing with growing feeling the wonder of being alive at this moment, and feeling that I live in a world that is called to be saved by the love of God. I contemplate its creation and history. Then, after meditating on the destruction of sin, I speak with Jesus about the grace of the forgiveness I have received. It is a dialogue about mercy, in which I reflect and give thanks to God our Lord, because has given me life until now, and I propose with His grace to amend my life from now on. To conclude, I say a heartfelt Our Father.

Navarrete – Logroño

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 8. Navarrete – Logroño (13 km)

Notes: We are still considering the presence of evil in our lives, but today in an entirely different way. We now open ourselves to the mercy of our Father. Ignatius invites us to experience the wonder to be felt when, in spite of the reality of our own sin, we come face to face with the infinite mercy of God. Today our attitude on our Walk is that of a repentant sinner, but above all of a sinner who is immensely loved.

Grace: Dear Father, I ask you for the gift of an interior, felt knowledge of my sinfulness so that I may experience also your love for me, as well as a growing desire to turn towards you and a renewed enthusiasm for following Jesus.

Reflections: You have reflected on the reality of human sin and your own sinfulness. Today you are invited to reflect on the awesome reality of God’s mercy. You are loved and forgiven, completely. “Repent and believe the Good News.” The two go hand in hand. That is, we first accept the reality of our sinfulness and repent truly that we have brought disharmony and disorder to our own life and to the world. We then believe the Good News: God is merciful, always has been and always will be. What ultimately matters is not that we are faithful to God (none of us is capable of complete fidelity) but that God is faithful to us. It is the same God who accompanies you: at your best moments, when you behave well and earn praise from all sides and at you most shameful moments, when you know there is good reason for you to be disgraced. You cannot earn God’s love, and you do not have to! God’s love is freely given, so freely given that seems impossible to us! The father in the parable, though he has every reason to be angry, harbors no resentment. His younger son has offended him and squandered what he worked so hard to accumulate, a thing we humans find almost impossible to accept. Indeed, the elder son cannot accept the forgiving attitude of the father.

In your life as sinner, you are not alone. You are forgiven. You are loved. And this is what drives us to repentance, to the desire to make amends. But we must know that we need God’s grace to repent and desire to do so: we do not know and follow the right way by our own wisdom and strength. Ask Jesus. Pray that you may be willing and able to accept fully what God offers so freely: forgiveness. We humans often go through life saddled with crippling guilt. God asks us instead to walk in freedom.

Scripture:

Luke 15: 11-32. This son of mine was dead and has come back to life; he was lost and is found.

Luke 5: 17-26. When Jesus saw their faith he said (to the paralytic), “Your sins are forgiven.”

John 8: 2-11. And Jesus said, “Neither do I condemn you. Go, and do not sin again.”

Romans 5: 1-8. God shows his love for us in that while we were still sinners Christ died for us.

Final Colloquy: I talk to Jesus as one friend does to another, experiencing with growing feeling the wonder of being alive at this moment, and feeling that I live in a world that is called to be saved by the love of God. I contemplate its creation and history. Then, after meditating on the destruction of sin, I speak with Jesus about the grace of the forgiveness I have received. It is a dialogue about mercy, in which I reflect and give thanks to God our Lord, because has given me life until now, and I propose with His grace to amend my life from now on. To conclude, I say a heartfelt Our Father.

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 8. Navarrete – Logroño (13 km)

Notes: We are still considering the presence of evil in our lives, but today in an entirely different way. We now open ourselves to the mercy of our Father. Ignatius invites us to experience the wonder to be felt when, in spite of the reality of our own sin, we come face to face with the infinite mercy of God. Today our attitude on our Walk is that of a repentant sinner, but above all of a sinner who is immensely loved.

Grace: Dear Father, I ask you for the gift of an interior, felt knowledge of my sinfulness so that I may experience also your love for me, as well as a growing desire to turn towards you and a renewed enthusiasm for following Jesus.

Reflections: You have reflected on the reality of human sin and your own sinfulness. Today you are invited to reflect on the awesome reality of God’s mercy. You are loved and forgiven, completely. “Repent and believe the Good News.” The two go hand in hand. That is, we first accept the reality of our sinfulness and repent truly that we have brought disharmony and disorder to our own life and to the world. We then believe the Good News: God is merciful, always has been and always will be. What ultimately matters is not that we are faithful to God (none of us is capable of complete fidelity) but that God is faithful to us. It is the same God who accompanies you: at your best moments, when you behave well and earn praise from all sides and at you most shameful moments, when you know there is good reason for you to be disgraced. You cannot earn God’s love, and you do not have to! God’s love is freely given, so freely given that seems impossible to us! The father in the parable, though he has every reason to be angry, harbors no resentment. His younger son has offended him and squandered what he worked so hard to accumulate, a thing we humans find almost impossible to accept. Indeed, the elder son cannot accept the forgiving attitude of the father.

In your life as sinner, you are not alone. You are forgiven. You are loved. And this is what drives us to repentance, to the desire to make amends. But we must know that we need God’s grace to repent and desire to do so: we do not know and follow the right way by our own wisdom and strength. Ask Jesus. Pray that you may be willing and able to accept fully what God offers so freely: forgiveness. We humans often go through life saddled with crippling guilt. God asks us instead to walk in freedom.

Scripture:

Luke 15: 11-32. This son of mine was dead and has come back to life; he was lost and is found.

Luke 5: 17-26. When Jesus saw their faith he said (to the paralytic), “Your sins are forgiven.”

John 8: 2-11. And Jesus said, “Neither do I condemn you. Go, and do not sin again.”

Romans 5: 1-8. God shows his love for us in that while we were still sinners Christ died for us.

Final Colloquy: I talk to Jesus as one friend does to another, experiencing with growing feeling the wonder of being alive at this moment, and feeling that I live in a world that is called to be saved by the love of God. I contemplate its creation and history. Then, after meditating on the destruction of sin, I speak with Jesus about the grace of the forgiveness I have received. It is a dialogue about mercy, in which I reflect and give thanks to God our Lord, because has given me life until now, and I propose with His grace to amend my life from now on. To conclude, I say a heartfelt Our Father.

Etapa 9

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 9. Logroño – Alcanadre (30,6 km)

Notes: Today we begin the “second week” of the Spiritual Exercises. Our point of entry is through a meditation that invites us to follow Christ the King. We are walking through a big city, so we can see the wonders of a “worldly kingdom” and imagine the Kingdom of God. Today we meditate on how our life is oriented: are we walkingwith Jesus or are we following other leaders?

The grace we ask for: Despite my limitations, yet aware of the love of the Father for me, I ask for the grace to feel personally called to journey alongside Jesus as his companion and co-laborer.

Reflection: A deep awareness of God’s merciful love (yesterday’s grace), often leads to a desire to respond to that love. Today we begin to meditate on Jesus’ invitation to walk beside him in his work. In the Spiritual Exercises Ignatius places God’s call to work with him just after the meditations that touch on our own human sinfulness; the juxtaposition is important: God calls us to work close to him while he knows us fully yet loves us as we are. He calls as ‘loved sinners;’ just as St Paul tells us when he asked the Lord to help him the Lord replied, “My grace is enough for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.” So Paul said, “I will all the more gladly boast of my weaknesses, that the power of Christ may rest upon me.” (2 Cor 12:9).  So, despite being sinners, today we feel called to work in that same world touched by our sin, and work for peace and justice, with the support of the merciful love we have received. We believe in a God who is justice because He is love. The road to justice and the road to faith in our world are inseparable. In the Gospel, Faith and justice are undivided. We are deeply conscious of how often and how grievously we ourselves have sinned against the Gospel, yet it remains our ambition to proclaim it worthily: that is, in love, in poverty, and in humility. This is what the Jesuit General Congregation 32 said.

In his famous meditation “The Call of the King”, Ignatius imagines how compelling would be the call of a truly worthy king, working in our world just for faith and justice. After that consideration, we turn to Jesus, whose call is even more worthy still because Christ our Lord, the eternal King calls each person in particular and says: “My will is to bring together the best in the whole world and build the Kingdom of Eternal Love”. Ignatius sees that all those who wish to throw in their lot with Christ the King must labor with Him, so that following Him in pain they may also follow Him in the glory of his Kingdom.

The call of the King is the call to become his companion, to learn more about Him, to experience His loving care and to join Him in serving His people. And this King comes to us as one of us, all the more able to share our lot. Today we focus on the marvel of being called and on the nature of the call; tomorrow you can begin to focus on your response to this call.

Scripture Texts:

Psalm 120. The Lord is kind and full of compassion.

Luke 5: 27-32. Follow me.

Micah 5:1-4. A mighty king will come to free his flock with the power of Yahweh.

Closing Colloquy: As a friend speaks to a friend, so we speak with Jesus. We bring together our thoughts and emotions from our meditation on the Kingdom and on the value of following Jesus. We discuss with Jesus and, if we so feel, we ask Him to invite us to walk with him.

Logroño – Alcanadre

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 9. Logroño – Alcanadre (30,6 km)

Notes: Today we begin the “second week” of the Spiritual Exercises. Our point of entry is through a meditation that invites us to follow Christ the King. We are walking through a big city, so we can see the wonders of a “worldly kingdom” and imagine the Kingdom of God. Today we meditate on how our life is oriented: are we walkingwith Jesus or are we following other leaders?

The grace we ask for: Despite my limitations, yet aware of the love of the Father for me, I ask for the grace to feel personally called to journey alongside Jesus as his companion and co-laborer.

Reflection: A deep awareness of God’s merciful love (yesterday’s grace), often leads to a desire to respond to that love. Today we begin to meditate on Jesus’ invitation to walk beside him in his work. In the Spiritual Exercises Ignatius places God’s call to work with him just after the meditations that touch on our own human sinfulness; the juxtaposition is important: God calls us to work close to him while he knows us fully yet loves us as we are. He calls as ‘loved sinners;’ just as St Paul tells us when he asked the Lord to help him the Lord replied, “My grace is enough for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.” So Paul said, “I will all the more gladly boast of my weaknesses, that the power of Christ may rest upon me.” (2 Cor 12:9).  So, despite being sinners, today we feel called to work in that same world touched by our sin, and work for peace and justice, with the support of the merciful love we have received. We believe in a God who is justice because He is love. The road to justice and the road to faith in our world are inseparable. In the Gospel, Faith and justice are undivided. We are deeply conscious of how often and how grievously we ourselves have sinned against the Gospel, yet it remains our ambition to proclaim it worthily: that is, in love, in poverty, and in humility. This is what the Jesuit General Congregation 32 said.

In his famous meditation “The Call of the King”, Ignatius imagines how compelling would be the call of a truly worthy king, working in our world just for faith and justice. After that consideration, we turn to Jesus, whose call is even more worthy still because Christ our Lord, the eternal King calls each person in particular and says: “My will is to bring together the best in the whole world and build the Kingdom of Eternal Love”. Ignatius sees that all those who wish to throw in their lot with Christ the King must labor with Him, so that following Him in pain they may also follow Him in the glory of his Kingdom.

The call of the King is the call to become his companion, to learn more about Him, to experience His loving care and to join Him in serving His people. And this King comes to us as one of us, all the more able to share our lot. Today we focus on the marvel of being called and on the nature of the call; tomorrow you can begin to focus on your response to this call.

Scripture Texts:

Psalm 120. The Lord is kind and full of compassion.

Luke 5: 27-32. Follow me.

Micah 5:1-4. A mighty king will come to free his flock with the power of Yahweh.

Closing Colloquy: As a friend speaks to a friend, so we speak with Jesus. We bring together our thoughts and emotions from our meditation on the Kingdom and on the value of following Jesus. We discuss with Jesus and, if we so feel, we ask Him to invite us to walk with him.

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 9. Logroño – Alcanadre (30,6 km)

Notes: Today we begin the “second week” of the Spiritual Exercises. Our point of entry is through a meditation that invites us to follow Christ the King. We are walking through a big city, so we can see the wonders of a “worldly kingdom” and imagine the Kingdom of God. Today we meditate on how our life is oriented: are we walkingwith Jesus or are we following other leaders?

The grace we ask for: Despite my limitations, yet aware of the love of the Father for me, I ask for the grace to feel personally called to journey alongside Jesus as his companion and co-laborer.

Reflection: A deep awareness of God’s merciful love (yesterday’s grace), often leads to a desire to respond to that love. Today we begin to meditate on Jesus’ invitation to walk beside him in his work. In the Spiritual Exercises Ignatius places God’s call to work with him just after the meditations that touch on our own human sinfulness; the juxtaposition is important: God calls us to work close to him while he knows us fully yet loves us as we are. He calls as ‘loved sinners;’ just as St Paul tells us when he asked the Lord to help him the Lord replied, “My grace is enough for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.” So Paul said, “I will all the more gladly boast of my weaknesses, that the power of Christ may rest upon me.” (2 Cor 12:9).  So, despite being sinners, today we feel called to work in that same world touched by our sin, and work for peace and justice, with the support of the merciful love we have received. We believe in a God who is justice because He is love. The road to justice and the road to faith in our world are inseparable. In the Gospel, Faith and justice are undivided. We are deeply conscious of how often and how grievously we ourselves have sinned against the Gospel, yet it remains our ambition to proclaim it worthily: that is, in love, in poverty, and in humility. This is what the Jesuit General Congregation 32 said.

In his famous meditation “The Call of the King”, Ignatius imagines how compelling would be the call of a truly worthy king, working in our world just for faith and justice. After that consideration, we turn to Jesus, whose call is even more worthy still because Christ our Lord, the eternal King calls each person in particular and says: “My will is to bring together the best in the whole world and build the Kingdom of Eternal Love”. Ignatius sees that all those who wish to throw in their lot with Christ the King must labor with Him, so that following Him in pain they may also follow Him in the glory of his Kingdom.

The call of the King is the call to become his companion, to learn more about Him, to experience His loving care and to join Him in serving His people. And this King comes to us as one of us, all the more able to share our lot. Today we focus on the marvel of being called and on the nature of the call; tomorrow you can begin to focus on your response to this call.

Scripture Texts:

Psalm 120. The Lord is kind and full of compassion.

Luke 5: 27-32. Follow me.

Micah 5:1-4. A mighty king will come to free his flock with the power of Yahweh.

Closing Colloquy: As a friend speaks to a friend, so we speak with Jesus. We bring together our thoughts and emotions from our meditation on the Kingdom and on the value of following Jesus. We discuss with Jesus and, if we so feel, we ask Him to invite us to walk with him.

Etapa 10

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 10. Alcanadre – Calahorra (21,5 km)

Notes: Do not forget the “Introductory Prayer” which is the final outcome of the entire experience. We should not forget that important prayer. This “second week” of our inner pilgrimage is characterized by intimacy: we want to know better our Lord and King, in order to follow him closer. Intimacy is required! We try to find that intimacy as a grace.

Grace: I ask the Father for three things that I need and only He can give: a more intimate knowledge of Jesus who has become one of us; a more personal experience of His love for me so that I may love Him more tenderly; and a closer union with Jesus in His mission of bringing salvation to humankind.

Reflection: The companion of Jesus the King grows in awareness of who the King is, what He stands for, who His enemies are, what His aspirations and plans are. One grows in intimacy by experiencing the loving presence of this King who calls, teaches, heals, challenges, nurtures and accepts His followers as they are. The companion of Jesus the King yearns to bear with Jesus all wrongs, abuse and poverty if that is what is required for intimate fellowship with Him. We know that we are never alone in the enterprise. We are in constant communion with the King in work, prayer and rest. The follower of the King shares totally in the mission of Jesus: to bring the good news of salvation, liberation, justice and peace to all people. Consider that Jesus’ call to us is of such a kind that no one can predict where our life journey will take us, the twists and turns of our career and relationships, unexpected death or remarkable good luck. Likewise, we don’t know where our journey by Jesus’ side will lead us any more than we know who we might meet at today’s journey’s end. And so, you are invited to join Jesus with generosity and great faith in Him.

This intimacy and generosity is also God’s deep desire towards humankind. God looks at humanity and feels that intimate calling in Him. The incarnation is the answer to God’s desire of generous intimacy. Ignatius invites us to look at the Holy Trinity which itself is looking at humankind and to share with God His vision: «I will see the various persons… on the face of the earth, so diverse in dress and behavior: some white and others black, some in peace and others at war, some weeping and others laughing, some healthy and others sick, some being born and others dying, and so forth.» Then, I will see and consider the three Holy Persons, seated, so to speak, on the royal capped throne of Their Divine Majesty. They are gazing on the whole face and circuit of the earth; and they see all the peoples in such great blindness, and how they are suffering and dying in the absurdity of sin… «I will hear what the Divine Persons are saying, that is, “Let us commit ourselves to the redemption of the human race.”»

Let us reflect on the reality of sin and on rebellion against God’s plan.

Now we reflect on God’s free and compassionate choice regarding this sinful world: that Jesus would come into human history, show a new way of being, redeem us and bring love to our heart of stone.

Scripture Texts:

Luke 1:26-38. God invites Mary to collaborate in the mystery of the Incarnation. Though free to say “no”, Mary chose freely to say “yes”. We feel the hope and wonder present in the scene: anything is possible with God; Elisabeth, who thought she was barren, is now in her seventh month; for nothing is impossible with God. If God can bring this about in the world, what can’t God do!?

Philippians 2:5-11. As I see myself in the presence of the Holy Trinity who determine that the Son is to become one of us, and as I contemplate Jesus present in the womb of Mary, I let this ancient Christological hymn express the awesome mystery of God the infinite being who has become finite, the unlimited limited, pure spirit enfleshed. John 1:1-14. Let us pray using the prologue of John’s Gospel and let God fill us with awe and wonder at the gift of Himself to me and to all His people.

Luke 1:39-55. Contemplating Mary’s visit to Elisabeth, let us try to be awake to the human and divine drama that is taking place. Let us be particularly attentive to Jesus present in the womb of Mary. The humanity in John the Baptist welcomes Jesus the Son of God.

The Closing Colloquy: Make a summary of what we have meditated on in our time of prayer, talking to Jesus as a friend does to a friend. Be honest with him regarding the items found at this time I have just done and end with the “Our Father”.

Alcanadre – Calahorra

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 10. Alcanadre – Calahorra (21,5 km)

Notes: Do not forget the “Introductory Prayer” which is the final outcome of the entire experience. We should not forget that important prayer. This “second week” of our inner pilgrimage is characterized by intimacy: we want to know better our Lord and King, in order to follow him closer. Intimacy is required! We try to find that intimacy as a grace.

Grace: I ask the Father for three things that I need and only He can give: a more intimate knowledge of Jesus who has become one of us; a more personal experience of His love for me so that I may love Him more tenderly; and a closer union with Jesus in His mission of bringing salvation to humankind.

Reflection: The companion of Jesus the King grows in awareness of who the King is, what He stands for, who His enemies are, what His aspirations and plans are. One grows in intimacy by experiencing the loving presence of this King who calls, teaches, heals, challenges, nurtures and accepts His followers as they are. The companion of Jesus the King yearns to bear with Jesus all wrongs, abuse and poverty if that is what is required for intimate fellowship with Him. We know that we are never alone in the enterprise. We are in constant communion with the King in work, prayer and rest. The follower of the King shares totally in the mission of Jesus: to bring the good news of salvation, liberation, justice and peace to all people. Consider that Jesus’ call to us is of such a kind that no one can predict where our life journey will take us, the twists and turns of our career and relationships, unexpected death or remarkable good luck. Likewise, we don’t know where our journey by Jesus’ side will lead us any more than we know who we might meet at today’s journey’s end. And so, you are invited to join Jesus with generosity and great faith in Him.

This intimacy and generosity is also God’s deep desire towards humankind. God looks at humanity and feels that intimate calling in Him. The incarnation is the answer to God’s desire of generous intimacy. Ignatius invites us to look at the Holy Trinity which itself is looking at humankind and to share with God His vision: «I will see the various persons… on the face of the earth, so diverse in dress and behavior: some white and others black, some in peace and others at war, some weeping and others laughing, some healthy and others sick, some being born and others dying, and so forth.» Then, I will see and consider the three Holy Persons, seated, so to speak, on the royal capped throne of Their Divine Majesty. They are gazing on the whole face and circuit of the earth; and they see all the peoples in such great blindness, and how they are suffering and dying in the absurdity of sin… «I will hear what the Divine Persons are saying, that is, “Let us commit ourselves to the redemption of the human race.”»

Let us reflect on the reality of sin and on rebellion against God’s plan.

Now we reflect on God’s free and compassionate choice regarding this sinful world: that Jesus would come into human history, show a new way of being, redeem us and bring love to our heart of stone.

Scripture Texts:

Luke 1:26-38. God invites Mary to collaborate in the mystery of the Incarnation. Though free to say “no”, Mary chose freely to say “yes”. We feel the hope and wonder present in the scene: anything is possible with God; Elisabeth, who thought she was barren, is now in her seventh month; for nothing is impossible with God. If God can bring this about in the world, what can’t God do!?

Philippians 2:5-11. As I see myself in the presence of the Holy Trinity who determine that the Son is to become one of us, and as I contemplate Jesus present in the womb of Mary, I let this ancient Christological hymn express the awesome mystery of God the infinite being who has become finite, the unlimited limited, pure spirit enfleshed. John 1:1-14. Let us pray using the prologue of John’s Gospel and let God fill us with awe and wonder at the gift of Himself to me and to all His people.

Luke 1:39-55. Contemplating Mary’s visit to Elisabeth, let us try to be awake to the human and divine drama that is taking place. Let us be particularly attentive to Jesus present in the womb of Mary. The humanity in John the Baptist welcomes Jesus the Son of God.

The Closing Colloquy: Make a summary of what we have meditated on in our time of prayer, talking to Jesus as a friend does to a friend. Be honest with him regarding the items found at this time I have just done and end with the “Our Father”.

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 10. Alcanadre – Calahorra (21,5 km)

Notes: Do not forget the “Introductory Prayer” which is the final outcome of the entire experience. We should not forget that important prayer. This “second week” of our inner pilgrimage is characterized by intimacy: we want to know better our Lord and King, in order to follow him closer. Intimacy is required! We try to find that intimacy as a grace.

Grace: I ask the Father for three things that I need and only He can give: a more intimate knowledge of Jesus who has become one of us; a more personal experience of His love for me so that I may love Him more tenderly; and a closer union with Jesus in His mission of bringing salvation to humankind.

Reflection: The companion of Jesus the King grows in awareness of who the King is, what He stands for, who His enemies are, what His aspirations and plans are. One grows in intimacy by experiencing the loving presence of this King who calls, teaches, heals, challenges, nurtures and accepts His followers as they are. The companion of Jesus the King yearns to bear with Jesus all wrongs, abuse and poverty if that is what is required for intimate fellowship with Him. We know that we are never alone in the enterprise. We are in constant communion with the King in work, prayer and rest. The follower of the King shares totally in the mission of Jesus: to bring the good news of salvation, liberation, justice and peace to all people. Consider that Jesus’ call to us is of such a kind that no one can predict where our life journey will take us, the twists and turns of our career and relationships, unexpected death or remarkable good luck. Likewise, we don’t know where our journey by Jesus’ side will lead us any more than we know who we might meet at today’s journey’s end. And so, you are invited to join Jesus with generosity and great faith in Him.

This intimacy and generosity is also God’s deep desire towards humankind. God looks at humanity and feels that intimate calling in Him. The incarnation is the answer to God’s desire of generous intimacy. Ignatius invites us to look at the Holy Trinity which itself is looking at humankind and to share with God His vision: «I will see the various persons… on the face of the earth, so diverse in dress and behavior: some white and others black, some in peace and others at war, some weeping and others laughing, some healthy and others sick, some being born and others dying, and so forth.» Then, I will see and consider the three Holy Persons, seated, so to speak, on the royal capped throne of Their Divine Majesty. They are gazing on the whole face and circuit of the earth; and they see all the peoples in such great blindness, and how they are suffering and dying in the absurdity of sin… «I will hear what the Divine Persons are saying, that is, “Let us commit ourselves to the redemption of the human race.”»

Let us reflect on the reality of sin and on rebellion against God’s plan.

Now we reflect on God’s free and compassionate choice regarding this sinful world: that Jesus would come into human history, show a new way of being, redeem us and bring love to our heart of stone.

Scripture Texts:

Luke 1:26-38. God invites Mary to collaborate in the mystery of the Incarnation. Though free to say “no”, Mary chose freely to say “yes”. We feel the hope and wonder present in the scene: anything is possible with God; Elisabeth, who thought she was barren, is now in her seventh month; for nothing is impossible with God. If God can bring this about in the world, what can’t God do!?

Philippians 2:5-11. As I see myself in the presence of the Holy Trinity who determine that the Son is to become one of us, and as I contemplate Jesus present in the womb of Mary, I let this ancient Christological hymn express the awesome mystery of God the infinite being who has become finite, the unlimited limited, pure spirit enfleshed. John 1:1-14. Let us pray using the prologue of John’s Gospel and let God fill us with awe and wonder at the gift of Himself to me and to all His people.

Luke 1:39-55. Contemplating Mary’s visit to Elisabeth, let us try to be awake to the human and divine drama that is taking place. Let us be particularly attentive to Jesus present in the womb of Mary. The humanity in John the Baptist welcomes Jesus the Son of God.

The Closing Colloquy: Make a summary of what we have meditated on in our time of prayer, talking to Jesus as a friend does to a friend. Be honest with him regarding the items found at this time I have just done and end with the “Our Father”.

Etapa 11

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 11. Calahorra – Alfaro (25,6 km)

Notes: The goal is not to gather facts about Jesus, but “to see Thee more clearly, love Thee more dearly, follow Thee more nearly.” Again, let us not forget the “introductory prayer,” which is the ultimate fruit of the entire experience. In this “second week” Ignatius introduces another kind of prayer: the contemplation of the Gospel mysteries.

Contemplative prayer. Ignatius asks us to “exercise” ourselves in contemplative prayer, a kind of imaginative prayer where all our senses are involved. Here is a little guidance: «Read the text of the story and then leave the text aside.  We begin by slowly picturing the scene as completely as we can.  Where is it happening?  Notice all the things in and around the scene.  Who’s there?  What is everyone wearing? How hot or cold is it?  What smells come to me?  I then enter even more into the scene, by becoming a character in it.  I might just let myself be a member of the crowd or I might become one of the principal characters in the story.  When I feel I’m in the scene, I let the story happen, and go wherever it goes.  Once inside the scene, the words and actions are not merely a videotaped replay of the text.  Inside the scene, I can back up and fill in how the scene began, I can let what is revealed to me be played out in the words and gestures of the participants, and I can speak or simply experience my own reactions.   The details of the text cease to be important as the experience of the story moves my heart.  Finally, I would end with a prayer, speaking to Our Lord, heart to heart, friend to friend, in whatever way comes to me, expressing my gratitude for the graces I have just received.”

We begin this type of exercise by contemplating the mystery of the Incarnation. Don’t be disappointed if you find this kind of prayer somewhat difficult: we are asked to pray from our own life, so everyone has their own way to God! But Ignatius finds this kind of prayer very useful, so try it!

Grace: We ask for a lasting appreciation of the miracle of the Incarnation through the person and response of Mary and Joseph; we beg for the grace to believe and accept the almost incredible good news that Jesus is among us and how that good news affects us. A deeper gratitude for the wonder of God being born in human form.

Reflection: Focus today on the miracle of the Incarnation, trying, as the cliché goes, to, “keep it real.” The Nativity crèche in a church typically figures a cherubic Jesus surrounded by clean, smiling at his parents, shepherds and kings. In fact, tradition tells us that Jesus was born after a long, uncomfortable trip in a place that must have been neglected and filthy. His parents, exhausted from travel, likely felt desolate and worried to deliver a child in an unsanitary, unfamiliar place, without the support of relatives. The Prince of Peace has come among us, but not in a way that any of us would have imagined. Feel all the same travails that you do as a pilgrim-traveler: will I get lost? Will something go wrong en route? Will adequate accommodation be available? What if I get sick? But now multiply these a thousand times, imagining yourself alongside a loved one with child.

Ignatius invites us to: «see Our Lady, Joseph and the infant Jesus after his birth. I will make myself a poor, little, unworthy slave, gazing at them, contemplating them, and serving them in their needs, just as if I were there, with all possible respect and reverence… Consider what they are doing: for example, journeying or toiling, in order that the Lord may be born in the greatest poverty; and that after so many hardships of hunger, thirst, heat, cold, injuries, and insults, he may die on the cross!  And all this for me!

Scripture Texts:

Matthew 1:18-25. Contemplating the mystery of the Incarnation, we enter into the feelings of Joseph and his struggle with law and love.

Luke 2:1-20. She gave birth to her first-born son and wrapped him in swaddling cloths, and laid him in a manger, because there was no room for them in the inn. Present with inner peace at His birth, I receive Jesus with joy and gratitude as the Father’s gift to me and to His people.

Closing Colloquy: “Finally, I end with a prayer, speaking to Our Lord, heart to heart, friend to friend, in whatever way comes to me, expressing my gratitude for the graces I had just received.” Ending with the Our Father.

Calahorra – Alfaro

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 11. Calahorra – Alfaro (25,6 km)

Notes: The goal is not to gather facts about Jesus, but “to see Thee more clearly, love Thee more dearly, follow Thee more nearly.” Again, let us not forget the “introductory prayer,” which is the ultimate fruit of the entire experience. In this “second week” Ignatius introduces another kind of prayer: the contemplation of the Gospel mysteries.

Contemplative prayer. Ignatius asks us to “exercise” ourselves in contemplative prayer, a kind of imaginative prayer where all our senses are involved. Here is a little guidance: «Read the text of the story and then leave the text aside.  We begin by slowly picturing the scene as completely as we can.  Where is it happening?  Notice all the things in and around the scene.  Who’s there?  What is everyone wearing? How hot or cold is it?  What smells come to me?  I then enter even more into the scene, by becoming a character in it.  I might just let myself be a member of the crowd or I might become one of the principal characters in the story.  When I feel I’m in the scene, I let the story happen, and go wherever it goes.  Once inside the scene, the words and actions are not merely a videotaped replay of the text.  Inside the scene, I can back up and fill in how the scene began, I can let what is revealed to me be played out in the words and gestures of the participants, and I can speak or simply experience my own reactions.   The details of the text cease to be important as the experience of the story moves my heart.  Finally, I would end with a prayer, speaking to Our Lord, heart to heart, friend to friend, in whatever way comes to me, expressing my gratitude for the graces I have just received.”

We begin this type of exercise by contemplating the mystery of the Incarnation. Don’t be disappointed if you find this kind of prayer somewhat difficult: we are asked to pray from our own life, so everyone has their own way to God! But Ignatius finds this kind of prayer very useful, so try it!

Grace: We ask for a lasting appreciation of the miracle of the Incarnation through the person and response of Mary and Joseph; we beg for the grace to believe and accept the almost incredible good news that Jesus is among us and how that good news affects us. A deeper gratitude for the wonder of God being born in human form.

Reflection: Focus today on the miracle of the Incarnation, trying, as the cliché goes, to, “keep it real.” The Nativity crèche in a church typically figures a cherubic Jesus surrounded by clean, smiling at his parents, shepherds and kings. In fact, tradition tells us that Jesus was born after a long, uncomfortable trip in a place that must have been neglected and filthy. His parents, exhausted from travel, likely felt desolate and worried to deliver a child in an unsanitary, unfamiliar place, without the support of relatives. The Prince of Peace has come among us, but not in a way that any of us would have imagined. Feel all the same travails that you do as a pilgrim-traveler: will I get lost? Will something go wrong en route? Will adequate accommodation be available? What if I get sick? But now multiply these a thousand times, imagining yourself alongside a loved one with child.

Ignatius invites us to: «see Our Lady, Joseph and the infant Jesus after his birth. I will make myself a poor, little, unworthy slave, gazing at them, contemplating them, and serving them in their needs, just as if I were there, with all possible respect and reverence… Consider what they are doing: for example, journeying or toiling, in order that the Lord may be born in the greatest poverty; and that after so many hardships of hunger, thirst, heat, cold, injuries, and insults, he may die on the cross!  And all this for me!

Scripture Texts:

Matthew 1:18-25. Contemplating the mystery of the Incarnation, we enter into the feelings of Joseph and his struggle with law and love.

Luke 2:1-20. She gave birth to her first-born son and wrapped him in swaddling cloths, and laid him in a manger, because there was no room for them in the inn. Present with inner peace at His birth, I receive Jesus with joy and gratitude as the Father’s gift to me and to His people.

Closing Colloquy: “Finally, I end with a prayer, speaking to Our Lord, heart to heart, friend to friend, in whatever way comes to me, expressing my gratitude for the graces I had just received.” Ending with the Our Father.

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 11. Calahorra – Alfaro (25,6 km)

Notes: The goal is not to gather facts about Jesus, but “to see Thee more clearly, love Thee more dearly, follow Thee more nearly.” Again, let us not forget the “introductory prayer,” which is the ultimate fruit of the entire experience. In this “second week” Ignatius introduces another kind of prayer: the contemplation of the Gospel mysteries.

Contemplative prayer. Ignatius asks us to “exercise” ourselves in contemplative prayer, a kind of imaginative prayer where all our senses are involved. Here is a little guidance: «Read the text of the story and then leave the text aside.  We begin by slowly picturing the scene as completely as we can.  Where is it happening?  Notice all the things in and around the scene.  Who’s there?  What is everyone wearing? How hot or cold is it?  What smells come to me?  I then enter even more into the scene, by becoming a character in it.  I might just let myself be a member of the crowd or I might become one of the principal characters in the story.  When I feel I’m in the scene, I let the story happen, and go wherever it goes.  Once inside the scene, the words and actions are not merely a videotaped replay of the text.  Inside the scene, I can back up and fill in how the scene began, I can let what is revealed to me be played out in the words and gestures of the participants, and I can speak or simply experience my own reactions.   The details of the text cease to be important as the experience of the story moves my heart.  Finally, I would end with a prayer, speaking to Our Lord, heart to heart, friend to friend, in whatever way comes to me, expressing my gratitude for the graces I have just received.”

We begin this type of exercise by contemplating the mystery of the Incarnation. Don’t be disappointed if you find this kind of prayer somewhat difficult: we are asked to pray from our own life, so everyone has their own way to God! But Ignatius finds this kind of prayer very useful, so try it!

Grace: We ask for a lasting appreciation of the miracle of the Incarnation through the person and response of Mary and Joseph; we beg for the grace to believe and accept the almost incredible good news that Jesus is among us and how that good news affects us. A deeper gratitude for the wonder of God being born in human form.

Reflection: Focus today on the miracle of the Incarnation, trying, as the cliché goes, to, “keep it real.” The Nativity crèche in a church typically figures a cherubic Jesus surrounded by clean, smiling at his parents, shepherds and kings. In fact, tradition tells us that Jesus was born after a long, uncomfortable trip in a place that must have been neglected and filthy. His parents, exhausted from travel, likely felt desolate and worried to deliver a child in an unsanitary, unfamiliar place, without the support of relatives. The Prince of Peace has come among us, but not in a way that any of us would have imagined. Feel all the same travails that you do as a pilgrim-traveler: will I get lost? Will something go wrong en route? Will adequate accommodation be available? What if I get sick? But now multiply these a thousand times, imagining yourself alongside a loved one with child.

Ignatius invites us to: «see Our Lady, Joseph and the infant Jesus after his birth. I will make myself a poor, little, unworthy slave, gazing at them, contemplating them, and serving them in their needs, just as if I were there, with all possible respect and reverence… Consider what they are doing: for example, journeying or toiling, in order that the Lord may be born in the greatest poverty; and that after so many hardships of hunger, thirst, heat, cold, injuries, and insults, he may die on the cross!  And all this for me!

Scripture Texts:

Matthew 1:18-25. Contemplating the mystery of the Incarnation, we enter into the feelings of Joseph and his struggle with law and love.

Luke 2:1-20. She gave birth to her first-born son and wrapped him in swaddling cloths, and laid him in a manger, because there was no room for them in the inn. Present with inner peace at His birth, I receive Jesus with joy and gratitude as the Father’s gift to me and to His people.

Closing Colloquy: “Finally, I end with a prayer, speaking to Our Lord, heart to heart, friend to friend, in whatever way comes to me, expressing my gratitude for the graces I had just received.” Ending with the Our Father.

Etapa 12

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 12. Alfaro – Tudela (25,6 km)

Notes: Remember that the aim of these meditations of week 2 is to see Jesus more clearly, to love Him more deeply and follow him more closely. Let us not forget the “Introductory Prayer,” the ultimate fruit of this entire exercise. Use this prayer of contemplation to enter into the gospel account of the Baptism of Jesus.

Grace: I ask the Father for three things that I need and that only He can give: a more intimate knowledge of Jesus who has become one of us; a more personal experience of His love for me so that I may love Him more tenderly; and a closer union with Jesus in His mission to bring salvation to humankind.

Reflection: Around thirty years of age, Jesus left his work and home to begin his public ministry. Try to imagine what thoughts he might have had.

Jesus’ public life began with a journey, a kind of pilgrimage. He left his home in Nazareth, and traveled south- east to the River Jordan where he was baptized by John the Baptist. John’s ministry was calling sinners to repentance. John was well known and respected: certainly Jesus knew of John’s message as a prophet of God sent to the Jewish people. Jesus knew what John was doing. Ponder the message that Jesus, the sinless one, chooses to launch his ministry by placing himself in solidarity with sinners. The symbolism of these early verses from the gospel summons up a rich imagery of a pilgrimage along a new way of life. John the Baptist’s ministry is introduced with the words of Isaiah: “Prepare the way of the Lord, make his paths straight.” John calls sinners to repentance and to conversion. It is a word with roots that suggest a “turning point.” John is inviting us to turn in a new direction and to follow a new path in life. At some moment, Jesus makes a conscious and deliberate choice to begin his ministry, to change his worldly life in Nazareth; imagine what might have been going through his mind, what he saw around him to make him feel this was the right moment. Consider too how he chooses to begin his ministry, not with a speech or a miracle, but by traveling to be baptized by John. And also consider the experience of Jesus in the Jordan, His discovery, His understanding of the mission which the Father invites Him to carry out fully.

You can beg the Father to place you with Jesus, His Son, in line with John the Baptist. Imagine that you are one of His companions and that you are right behind Him, because you want to know Him better, love Him more and be more faithful in serving Him and humanity. Try to contemplate the gospel scene. What is John telling us?

Scripture Texts:

Romans 6:3-4. Just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, so that we too might walk in newness of life.

Luke 3:1-22. “Then what are we to do?” At the moment of His baptism by John God’s voice confirms His sonship and His mission.

Matthew 3:13-17. Jesus, having pondered in His heart the mystery of the Fatherhood of God and the mission given Him by the Father, decides to leave Nazareth. I try to be present to Him as He reaches this decision, shares it with His mother, makes His farewells and leaves all that has helped to form Him as an adult and responsible human being. Let us walk with Him towards the Jordan River and stay on the river bank contemplating His baptism. What is it that I hear? What should I understand?

Closing Colloquy: Make a summary of what I have meditated upon during my time of prayer, talking to Jesus as a friend talks to a friend, being candid with him about the items found at this stage of the journey we have done. End with the Our Father.

Alfaro – Tudela

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 12. Alfaro – Tudela (25,6 km)

Notes: Remember that the aim of these meditations of week 2 is to see Jesus more clearly, to love Him more deeply and follow him more closely. Let us not forget the “Introductory Prayer,” the ultimate fruit of this entire exercise. Use this prayer of contemplation to enter into the gospel account of the Baptism of Jesus.

Grace: I ask the Father for three things that I need and that only He can give: a more intimate knowledge of Jesus who has become one of us; a more personal experience of His love for me so that I may love Him more tenderly; and a closer union with Jesus in His mission to bring salvation to humankind.

Reflection: Around thirty years of age, Jesus left his work and home to begin his public ministry. Try to imagine what thoughts he might have had.

Jesus’ public life began with a journey, a kind of pilgrimage. He left his home in Nazareth, and traveled south- east to the River Jordan where he was baptized by John the Baptist. John’s ministry was calling sinners to repentance. John was well known and respected: certainly Jesus knew of John’s message as a prophet of God sent to the Jewish people. Jesus knew what John was doing. Ponder the message that Jesus, the sinless one, chooses to launch his ministry by placing himself in solidarity with sinners. The symbolism of these early verses from the gospel summons up a rich imagery of a pilgrimage along a new way of life. John the Baptist’s ministry is introduced with the words of Isaiah: “Prepare the way of the Lord, make his paths straight.” John calls sinners to repentance and to conversion. It is a word with roots that suggest a “turning point.” John is inviting us to turn in a new direction and to follow a new path in life. At some moment, Jesus makes a conscious and deliberate choice to begin his ministry, to change his worldly life in Nazareth; imagine what might have been going through his mind, what he saw around him to make him feel this was the right moment. Consider too how he chooses to begin his ministry, not with a speech or a miracle, but by traveling to be baptized by John. And also consider the experience of Jesus in the Jordan, His discovery, His understanding of the mission which the Father invites Him to carry out fully.

You can beg the Father to place you with Jesus, His Son, in line with John the Baptist. Imagine that you are one of His companions and that you are right behind Him, because you want to know Him better, love Him more and be more faithful in serving Him and humanity. Try to contemplate the gospel scene. What is John telling us?

Scripture Texts:

Romans 6:3-4. Just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, so that we too might walk in newness of life.

Luke 3:1-22. “Then what are we to do?” At the moment of His baptism by John God’s voice confirms His sonship and His mission.

Matthew 3:13-17. Jesus, having pondered in His heart the mystery of the Fatherhood of God and the mission given Him by the Father, decides to leave Nazareth. I try to be present to Him as He reaches this decision, shares it with His mother, makes His farewells and leaves all that has helped to form Him as an adult and responsible human being. Let us walk with Him towards the Jordan River and stay on the river bank contemplating His baptism. What is it that I hear? What should I understand?

Closing Colloquy: Make a summary of what I have meditated upon during my time of prayer, talking to Jesus as a friend talks to a friend, being candid with him about the items found at this stage of the journey we have done. End with the Our Father.

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 12. Alfaro – Tudela (25,6 km)

Notes: Remember that the aim of these meditations of week 2 is to see Jesus more clearly, to love Him more deeply and follow him more closely. Let us not forget the “Introductory Prayer,” the ultimate fruit of this entire exercise. Use this prayer of contemplation to enter into the gospel account of the Baptism of Jesus.

Grace: I ask the Father for three things that I need and that only He can give: a more intimate knowledge of Jesus who has become one of us; a more personal experience of His love for me so that I may love Him more tenderly; and a closer union with Jesus in His mission to bring salvation to humankind.

Reflection: Around thirty years of age, Jesus left his work and home to begin his public ministry. Try to imagine what thoughts he might have had.

Jesus’ public life began with a journey, a kind of pilgrimage. He left his home in Nazareth, and traveled south- east to the River Jordan where he was baptized by John the Baptist. John’s ministry was calling sinners to repentance. John was well known and respected: certainly Jesus knew of John’s message as a prophet of God sent to the Jewish people. Jesus knew what John was doing. Ponder the message that Jesus, the sinless one, chooses to launch his ministry by placing himself in solidarity with sinners. The symbolism of these early verses from the gospel summons up a rich imagery of a pilgrimage along a new way of life. John the Baptist’s ministry is introduced with the words of Isaiah: “Prepare the way of the Lord, make his paths straight.” John calls sinners to repentance and to conversion. It is a word with roots that suggest a “turning point.” John is inviting us to turn in a new direction and to follow a new path in life. At some moment, Jesus makes a conscious and deliberate choice to begin his ministry, to change his worldly life in Nazareth; imagine what might have been going through his mind, what he saw around him to make him feel this was the right moment. Consider too how he chooses to begin his ministry, not with a speech or a miracle, but by traveling to be baptized by John. And also consider the experience of Jesus in the Jordan, His discovery, His understanding of the mission which the Father invites Him to carry out fully.

You can beg the Father to place you with Jesus, His Son, in line with John the Baptist. Imagine that you are one of His companions and that you are right behind Him, because you want to know Him better, love Him more and be more faithful in serving Him and humanity. Try to contemplate the gospel scene. What is John telling us?

Scripture Texts:

Romans 6:3-4. Just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, so that we too might walk in newness of life.

Luke 3:1-22. “Then what are we to do?” At the moment of His baptism by John God’s voice confirms His sonship and His mission.

Matthew 3:13-17. Jesus, having pondered in His heart the mystery of the Fatherhood of God and the mission given Him by the Father, decides to leave Nazareth. I try to be present to Him as He reaches this decision, shares it with His mother, makes His farewells and leaves all that has helped to form Him as an adult and responsible human being. Let us walk with Him towards the Jordan River and stay on the river bank contemplating His baptism. What is it that I hear? What should I understand?

Closing Colloquy: Make a summary of what I have meditated upon during my time of prayer, talking to Jesus as a friend talks to a friend, being candid with him about the items found at this stage of the journey we have done. End with the Our Father.

Etapa 13

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 13. Tudela – Gallur (39,3 km)

Notes: Again we persist in making the introductory prayer. Today we make enter a consideration typical of the Spiritual Exercises: the meditation titled “The Two Standards.” Saint Ignatius offers us an exercise of contrast to see what our life is opting for, in our following of Jesus. Throughout the day we can be considering and asking the grace of this exercise and feel that Jesus wants us to go on pilgrimage with Him. The typical “Triple Discussion” that Saint Ignatius offers in the exercises, can be done as it is set out here… or done as your heart tells you, in accordance with the layout of the pilgrimage that we are engaged in.

Grace: As a friend of Jesus, I ask God to allow me to share the gift of being able to recognize the deceits of the devil so that I can guard against them; I also ask for a true knowledge of Jesus Christ, my true Leader and Lord, and the grace to imitate Him.

Reflection: Over the coming days we will reflect on Jesus’ earthly ministry, and on his way of living and working in accordance with the values of the Kingdom. Today we take a meditation commonly known as the “two standards” (standard as in a banner). We can imagine Jesus prepared to set out on his own journey, poised at a critical fork in the road. He has no doubt which way he is going, and he figuratively asks us to join him. Jesus’ values and Jesus’ “Way” is the way of simplicity (even of poverty), leading so many times to dishonor and to humility: in other words, it is the way of those who share their life with God and hope for everything from Him. The other way, is the worldly choice of riches, honor, and pride: in other words, to have the things and prestige that makes us feel important in the world, to turn ourselves into the gods of our own life, and be “the only ones in the world”. Earlier in this spiritual pilgrimage, Ignatius invited us to make a fundamental choice: to be faithful to our Principle and Foundation. This is not a new choice, a “do over,” rather, it is a reminder, a deeper insight into the Way of Jesus and to check our desire to follow Him, choosing a way that it is fundamentally different to the ways of the world. Who are we: are we our possessions and reputation? Or are we God’s beloved creation? Why are we important?  Is it because others know us, or because God has chosen us? Jesus is inviting us to lighten our load so as to be able to walk beside him freely on our spiritual pilgrimage through life.

The purpose of this meditation is to become aware of the strategies of Jesus and of the Evil One so that I may accurately discern the spirits which I often experience when I have to make a decision in my life: In what direction am I going? Am I going with Jesus? As Ignatius says: “We shall in our next exercise observe the intention of Christ our Lord and, in contrast, that of the Evil One, the enemy of human nature… Imagine that the leader of all the enemies in that great plain of Babylon calling all his supporters… and sending them to tempt people to covet riches, so that they may more easily come to vain honor from the world, and finally to surging pride. And from there all the disasters in the world are guaranteed. Similarly, by contrast, gaze in imagination on the supreme and true leader, who is Christ our Lord summoning all His people… sending them to attract all persons, first, into the most perfect spiritual poverty, and also, if the Divine Majesty should be served and should wish to choose them for it, even to no less a degree of actual poverty; and second, by attracting them to a desire of reproaches and contempt, since from these humility results. And from there true humility will follow.” We should consider these two banners and make a choice from our heart: Shall I go with Jesus? Do I really feel that? Is that what I desire?

Scripture texts:

1 Tim 6: 6-10. Those who desire to be rich fall into temptation, into a snare, into many senseless and hurtful desires that plunge men into ruin and destruction.

Galatians 5:16-25. I pray to know what it is like to be with and without the Spirit.

Ephesians 6:10-20. War of the spirit.

Final Triple Colloquy: «1st A discussion with Our Lady that she obtain for me from her son and Lord the grace, to be received under his banner, and first in spiritual poverty, and if His Divine Majesty would be served and He wishes to choose me and be received no less in actual poverty, and second, to spend more insults and slander in order to imitate him, only if that could happen without sin on the part of any person or displeasure of His Divine Majesty, and with it a Hail Mary.

2nd conversation: Ask the same of the Son, that he may obtain it from the Father, and with it say an Anima Christi.

3rd conversation. Ask the same of the Father, that he grant it to me, and say an Our Father.»

[‘Anima Christi’ prayer. It is a prayer from around the 14th century. It is still widely used after receiving the body and blood of Our Lord, Jesus Christ in Holy Communion. Certainly Saint Ignatius prayed with it very often and that’s why he wrote it in the Spiritual Exercices.]

Soul of Christ, sanctify me

Body of Christ, save me

Blood of Christ, inebriate me

Water from Christ’s side, wash me

Passion of Christ, strengthen me

O good Jesus, hear me

Within Thy wounds hide me

Suffer me not to be separated from Thee

From the malicious enemy defend me

In the hour of my death call me

And bid me come unto Thee

That I may praise Thee with Thy saints

and with Thy angels

Forever and ever. Amen.

Tudela – Gallur

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 13. Tudela – Gallur (39,3 km)

Notes: Again we persist in making the introductory prayer. Today we make enter a consideration typical of the Spiritual Exercises: the meditation titled “The Two Standards.” Saint Ignatius offers us an exercise of contrast to see what our life is opting for, in our following of Jesus. Throughout the day we can be considering and asking the grace of this exercise and feel that Jesus wants us to go on pilgrimage with Him. The typical “Triple Discussion” that Saint Ignatius offers in the exercises, can be done as it is set out here… or done as your heart tells you, in accordance with the layout of the pilgrimage that we are engaged in.

Grace: As a friend of Jesus, I ask God to allow me to share the gift of being able to recognize the deceits of the devil so that I can guard against them; I also ask for a true knowledge of Jesus Christ, my true Leader and Lord, and the grace to imitate Him.

Reflection: Over the coming days we will reflect on Jesus’ earthly ministry, and on his way of living and working in accordance with the values of the Kingdom. Today we take a meditation commonly known as the “two standards” (standard as in a banner). We can imagine Jesus prepared to set out on his own journey, poised at a critical fork in the road. He has no doubt which way he is going, and he figuratively asks us to join him. Jesus’ values and Jesus’ “Way” is the way of simplicity (even of poverty), leading so many times to dishonor and to humility: in other words, it is the way of those who share their life with God and hope for everything from Him. The other way, is the worldly choice of riches, honor, and pride: in other words, to have the things and prestige that makes us feel important in the world, to turn ourselves into the gods of our own life, and be “the only ones in the world”. Earlier in this spiritual pilgrimage, Ignatius invited us to make a fundamental choice: to be faithful to our Principle and Foundation. This is not a new choice, a “do over,” rather, it is a reminder, a deeper insight into the Way of Jesus and to check our desire to follow Him, choosing a way that it is fundamentally different to the ways of the world. Who are we: are we our possessions and reputation? Or are we God’s beloved creation? Why are we important?  Is it because others know us, or because God has chosen us? Jesus is inviting us to lighten our load so as to be able to walk beside him freely on our spiritual pilgrimage through life.

The purpose of this meditation is to become aware of the strategies of Jesus and of the Evil One so that I may accurately discern the spirits which I often experience when I have to make a decision in my life: In what direction am I going? Am I going with Jesus? As Ignatius says: “We shall in our next exercise observe the intention of Christ our Lord and, in contrast, that of the Evil One, the enemy of human nature… Imagine that the leader of all the enemies in that great plain of Babylon calling all his supporters… and sending them to tempt people to covet riches, so that they may more easily come to vain honor from the world, and finally to surging pride. And from there all the disasters in the world are guaranteed. Similarly, by contrast, gaze in imagination on the supreme and true leader, who is Christ our Lord summoning all His people… sending them to attract all persons, first, into the most perfect spiritual poverty, and also, if the Divine Majesty should be served and should wish to choose them for it, even to no less a degree of actual poverty; and second, by attracting them to a desire of reproaches and contempt, since from these humility results. And from there true humility will follow.” We should consider these two banners and make a choice from our heart: Shall I go with Jesus? Do I really feel that? Is that what I desire?

Scripture texts:

1 Tim 6: 6-10. Those who desire to be rich fall into temptation, into a snare, into many senseless and hurtful desires that plunge men into ruin and destruction.

Galatians 5:16-25. I pray to know what it is like to be with and without the Spirit.

Ephesians 6:10-20. War of the spirit.

Final Triple Colloquy: «1st A discussion with Our Lady that she obtain for me from her son and Lord the grace, to be received under his banner, and first in spiritual poverty, and if His Divine Majesty would be served and He wishes to choose me and be received no less in actual poverty, and second, to spend more insults and slander in order to imitate him, only if that could happen without sin on the part of any person or displeasure of His Divine Majesty, and with it a Hail Mary.

2nd conversation: Ask the same of the Son, that he may obtain it from the Father, and with it say an Anima Christi.

3rd conversation. Ask the same of the Father, that he grant it to me, and say an Our Father.»

[‘Anima Christi’ prayer. It is a prayer from around the 14th century. It is still widely used after receiving the body and blood of Our Lord, Jesus Christ in Holy Communion. Certainly Saint Ignatius prayed with it very often and that’s why he wrote it in the Spiritual Exercices.]

Soul of Christ, sanctify me

Body of Christ, save me

Blood of Christ, inebriate me

Water from Christ’s side, wash me

Passion of Christ, strengthen me

O good Jesus, hear me

Within Thy wounds hide me

Suffer me not to be separated from Thee

From the malicious enemy defend me

In the hour of my death call me

And bid me come unto Thee

That I may praise Thee with Thy saints

and with Thy angels

Forever and ever. Amen.

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 13. Tudela – Gallur (39,3 km)

Notes: Again we persist in making the introductory prayer. Today we make enter a consideration typical of the Spiritual Exercises: the meditation titled “The Two Standards.” Saint Ignatius offers us an exercise of contrast to see what our life is opting for, in our following of Jesus. Throughout the day we can be considering and asking the grace of this exercise and feel that Jesus wants us to go on pilgrimage with Him. The typical “Triple Discussion” that Saint Ignatius offers in the exercises, can be done as it is set out here… or done as your heart tells you, in accordance with the layout of the pilgrimage that we are engaged in.

Grace: As a friend of Jesus, I ask God to allow me to share the gift of being able to recognize the deceits of the devil so that I can guard against them; I also ask for a true knowledge of Jesus Christ, my true Leader and Lord, and the grace to imitate Him.

Reflection: Over the coming days we will reflect on Jesus’ earthly ministry, and on his way of living and working in accordance with the values of the Kingdom. Today we take a meditation commonly known as the “two standards” (standard as in a banner). We can imagine Jesus prepared to set out on his own journey, poised at a critical fork in the road. He has no doubt which way he is going, and he figuratively asks us to join him. Jesus’ values and Jesus’ “Way” is the way of simplicity (even of poverty), leading so many times to dishonor and to humility: in other words, it is the way of those who share their life with God and hope for everything from Him. The other way, is the worldly choice of riches, honor, and pride: in other words, to have the things and prestige that makes us feel important in the world, to turn ourselves into the gods of our own life, and be “the only ones in the world”. Earlier in this spiritual pilgrimage, Ignatius invited us to make a fundamental choice: to be faithful to our Principle and Foundation. This is not a new choice, a “do over,” rather, it is a reminder, a deeper insight into the Way of Jesus and to check our desire to follow Him, choosing a way that it is fundamentally different to the ways of the world. Who are we: are we our possessions and reputation? Or are we God’s beloved creation? Why are we important?  Is it because others know us, or because God has chosen us? Jesus is inviting us to lighten our load so as to be able to walk beside him freely on our spiritual pilgrimage through life.

The purpose of this meditation is to become aware of the strategies of Jesus and of the Evil One so that I may accurately discern the spirits which I often experience when I have to make a decision in my life: In what direction am I going? Am I going with Jesus? As Ignatius says: “We shall in our next exercise observe the intention of Christ our Lord and, in contrast, that of the Evil One, the enemy of human nature… Imagine that the leader of all the enemies in that great plain of Babylon calling all his supporters… and sending them to tempt people to covet riches, so that they may more easily come to vain honor from the world, and finally to surging pride. And from there all the disasters in the world are guaranteed. Similarly, by contrast, gaze in imagination on the supreme and true leader, who is Christ our Lord summoning all His people… sending them to attract all persons, first, into the most perfect spiritual poverty, and also, if the Divine Majesty should be served and should wish to choose them for it, even to no less a degree of actual poverty; and second, by attracting them to a desire of reproaches and contempt, since from these humility results. And from there true humility will follow.” We should consider these two banners and make a choice from our heart: Shall I go with Jesus? Do I really feel that? Is that what I desire?

Scripture texts:

1 Tim 6: 6-10. Those who desire to be rich fall into temptation, into a snare, into many senseless and hurtful desires that plunge men into ruin and destruction.

Galatians 5:16-25. I pray to know what it is like to be with and without the Spirit.

Ephesians 6:10-20. War of the spirit.

Final Triple Colloquy: «1st A discussion with Our Lady that she obtain for me from her son and Lord the grace, to be received under his banner, and first in spiritual poverty, and if His Divine Majesty would be served and He wishes to choose me and be received no less in actual poverty, and second, to spend more insults and slander in order to imitate him, only if that could happen without sin on the part of any person or displeasure of His Divine Majesty, and with it a Hail Mary.

2nd conversation: Ask the same of the Son, that he may obtain it from the Father, and with it say an Anima Christi.

3rd conversation. Ask the same of the Father, that he grant it to me, and say an Our Father.»

[‘Anima Christi’ prayer. It is a prayer from around the 14th century. It is still widely used after receiving the body and blood of Our Lord, Jesus Christ in Holy Communion. Certainly Saint Ignatius prayed with it very often and that’s why he wrote it in the Spiritual Exercices.]

Soul of Christ, sanctify me

Body of Christ, save me

Blood of Christ, inebriate me

Water from Christ’s side, wash me

Passion of Christ, strengthen me

O good Jesus, hear me

Within Thy wounds hide me

Suffer me not to be separated from Thee

From the malicious enemy defend me

In the hour of my death call me

And bid me come unto Thee

That I may praise Thee with Thy saints

and with Thy angels

Forever and ever. Amen.

Etapa 14

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 14. Gallur – Alagón (21,7 km)

Notes: We keep walking with Jesus, in order to see more clearly, love Him more deeply and follow Him more closely. Do not forget the “introductory prayer” both before we pray and throughout the day. Starting today, the final conversation is becoming even more important: we move into this interior knowledge of Jesus who is to strengthen our commitment to life. We talk about this with our “friend” at the end of our prayer and during the day.

Grace: I ask the Father for three things that I need and that only He can grant: a more intimate knowledge of Jesus who has become one of us; a more personal experience of His love for me so that I may love Him more tenderly; and a closer union with Jesus in His mission of bringing salvation to humankind.

Reflection: Jesus as a person who heals people may be the image that stands out most clearly in public life. The healing ministry of Jesus is also a saving ministry.  Jesus heals bodies, spirits, and broken relationships with God and with others by means of forgiveness. Jesus tells a paralytic to get up and walk, rubs mud over a blind man’s eyes. His concern is not just for the withered limb or the non-functioning organ. It is also that the one whom He heals may turn from sin and believe in Him. We know His wonderful compassion, his willingness to touch and engage with the outcasts and untouchables of ancient society. Use the Ignatian practice of contemplation: that is, imagine one or more of these healing scenes from Jesus’ ministry, and imagine yourself in the scene, perhaps as a companion traveling with Jesus, or perhaps people bring me to Jesus – What is it that I want Jesus to do to heal me? On entering into these mysteries in my pilgrimage, I present myself to Jesus as one in need of healing in body, mind and spirit. I wish to keep on asking for the grace of this day.

Scripture Texts:

Luke 18: 35-43. “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!”

John 5:1-9. Jesus’ question to a sick and crippled man is, in my contemplation, addressed also to me: “Do you want to be healed?” I show the Lord my need for healing: my pettiness, my pride, my ambition, my need for security and control, my self-deception. Yes, Lord, I want to be healed.

Luke 8:40-56. I beg Jesus to come to my home. I try to touch the hem of His cloak.

Closing Colloquy: Make a summary of the things I have meditated upon during my time of prayer, talking to Jesus as a friend talks to a friend. Be honest with him about the items I dealt with at this time. Ask Him to accept you under His banner and to become a healer like Him. End with the “Our Father”.

Gallur – Alagón

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 14. Gallur – Alagón (21,7 km)

Notes: We keep walking with Jesus, in order to see more clearly, love Him more deeply and follow Him more closely. Do not forget the “introductory prayer” both before we pray and throughout the day. Starting today, the final conversation is becoming even more important: we move into this interior knowledge of Jesus who is to strengthen our commitment to life. We talk about this with our “friend” at the end of our prayer and during the day.

Grace: I ask the Father for three things that I need and that only He can grant: a more intimate knowledge of Jesus who has become one of us; a more personal experience of His love for me so that I may love Him more tenderly; and a closer union with Jesus in His mission of bringing salvation to humankind.

Reflection: Jesus as a person who heals people may be the image that stands out most clearly in public life. The healing ministry of Jesus is also a saving ministry.  Jesus heals bodies, spirits, and broken relationships with God and with others by means of forgiveness. Jesus tells a paralytic to get up and walk, rubs mud over a blind man’s eyes. His concern is not just for the withered limb or the non-functioning organ. It is also that the one whom He heals may turn from sin and believe in Him. We know His wonderful compassion, his willingness to touch and engage with the outcasts and untouchables of ancient society. Use the Ignatian practice of contemplation: that is, imagine one or more of these healing scenes from Jesus’ ministry, and imagine yourself in the scene, perhaps as a companion traveling with Jesus, or perhaps people bring me to Jesus – What is it that I want Jesus to do to heal me? On entering into these mysteries in my pilgrimage, I present myself to Jesus as one in need of healing in body, mind and spirit. I wish to keep on asking for the grace of this day.

Scripture Texts:

Luke 18: 35-43. “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!”

John 5:1-9. Jesus’ question to a sick and crippled man is, in my contemplation, addressed also to me: “Do you want to be healed?” I show the Lord my need for healing: my pettiness, my pride, my ambition, my need for security and control, my self-deception. Yes, Lord, I want to be healed.

Luke 8:40-56. I beg Jesus to come to my home. I try to touch the hem of His cloak.

Closing Colloquy: Make a summary of the things I have meditated upon during my time of prayer, talking to Jesus as a friend talks to a friend. Be honest with him about the items I dealt with at this time. Ask Him to accept you under His banner and to become a healer like Him. End with the “Our Father”.

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 14. Gallur – Alagón (21,7 km)

Notes: We keep walking with Jesus, in order to see more clearly, love Him more deeply and follow Him more closely. Do not forget the “introductory prayer” both before we pray and throughout the day. Starting today, the final conversation is becoming even more important: we move into this interior knowledge of Jesus who is to strengthen our commitment to life. We talk about this with our “friend” at the end of our prayer and during the day.

Grace: I ask the Father for three things that I need and that only He can grant: a more intimate knowledge of Jesus who has become one of us; a more personal experience of His love for me so that I may love Him more tenderly; and a closer union with Jesus in His mission of bringing salvation to humankind.

Reflection: Jesus as a person who heals people may be the image that stands out most clearly in public life. The healing ministry of Jesus is also a saving ministry.  Jesus heals bodies, spirits, and broken relationships with God and with others by means of forgiveness. Jesus tells a paralytic to get up and walk, rubs mud over a blind man’s eyes. His concern is not just for the withered limb or the non-functioning organ. It is also that the one whom He heals may turn from sin and believe in Him. We know His wonderful compassion, his willingness to touch and engage with the outcasts and untouchables of ancient society. Use the Ignatian practice of contemplation: that is, imagine one or more of these healing scenes from Jesus’ ministry, and imagine yourself in the scene, perhaps as a companion traveling with Jesus, or perhaps people bring me to Jesus – What is it that I want Jesus to do to heal me? On entering into these mysteries in my pilgrimage, I present myself to Jesus as one in need of healing in body, mind and spirit. I wish to keep on asking for the grace of this day.

Scripture Texts:

Luke 18: 35-43. “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!”

John 5:1-9. Jesus’ question to a sick and crippled man is, in my contemplation, addressed also to me: “Do you want to be healed?” I show the Lord my need for healing: my pettiness, my pride, my ambition, my need for security and control, my self-deception. Yes, Lord, I want to be healed.

Luke 8:40-56. I beg Jesus to come to my home. I try to touch the hem of His cloak.

Closing Colloquy: Make a summary of the things I have meditated upon during my time of prayer, talking to Jesus as a friend talks to a friend. Be honest with him about the items I dealt with at this time. Ask Him to accept you under His banner and to become a healer like Him. End with the “Our Father”.

Etapa 15

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 15. Alagón – Zaragoza (30,5 km)

Notes: We continue to walk with Jesus, in order to see more Him more clearly, love Him more deeply and follow Him more closely. There is no further need to remind you to say the “introductory prayer” before you begin and throughout the day. Remember also that the final conversation is becoming more and more important as we move into this interior knowledge of Jesus who is strengthening our commitment to life. This is discussed with our “friend” Jesus in our conversation at the end of our prayer and during the day.

Grace: I will ask the Father for three things that I need and that only He can grant: a more intimate knowledge of Jesus who has become one of us; a more personal experience of His love for me so that I may love Him more tenderly; and a closer union with Jesus in His mission of bringing salvation to humankind.

Reflection: After watching Jesus healing, another great image of Jesus to admire is his preaching: He was a real innovator as well as a really free man! Admire the clarity and purity of Jesus’ message, and his courage in proclaiming it, even though he was well aware of the danger he was courting. Jesus maintains his unyielding focus on the justice of God’s kingdom. He accepts no hypocrisy, no double dealing. He rejects legalistic or ritualistic positions that raise the letter of law above its true spirit.

Jesus promulgates his new alliance, his plan for living, his plan of action for how we, his followers, will help restore this world to what God originally planned for how human beings would treat one another. The famed “Sermon on the Mount” or “the Manifesto of the Kingdom” comes early in Jesus’ ministry. We have heard these words before, but do not let its familiarity detract from its radical appeal. Listening reverently to this discourse I allow the seed of Jesus’ word to be implanted in me and to take root. Imagine yourself sitting among the impoverished people who gathered on a hillside to listen to Jesus comprehensively laying out his path, his “Way.” Then as now, his way is highly counterintuitive; he is inviting us to be and to live for values that are exactly the opposite of what contemporary culture and advertising tell us to do. In His time, Jesus was in contradiction to His world.

Scripture Texts:

Matthew 23: 11-12; 23-24. He who is greatest among you shall be your servant; whoever exalts himself will be humbled, and whoever humbles himself will be exalted.

Matthew 5: 1-48. Seeing the crowds, he went up on the mountain, and when he sat down his disciples came to him. And he opened his mouth and taught them, saying…

John 12:44-50. I gear myself up to listen to Jesus, for when I hear His message, I hear the Father.

Closing Conversation: Make a summary of the things I have meditated on during my prayer, talking to Jesus as a friend talks to a friend. Be candid with him about the things I have just found at this time of prayer. If that is how I feel, ask Him to be accepted under His banner. Finish with the Our Father.

Alagón – Zaragoza

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 15. Alagón – Zaragoza (30,5 km)

Notes: We continue to walk with Jesus, in order to see more Him more clearly, love Him more deeply and follow Him more closely. There is no further need to remind you to say the “introductory prayer” before you begin and throughout the day. Remember also that the final conversation is becoming more and more important as we move into this interior knowledge of Jesus who is strengthening our commitment to life. This is discussed with our “friend” Jesus in our conversation at the end of our prayer and during the day.

Grace: I will ask the Father for three things that I need and that only He can grant: a more intimate knowledge of Jesus who has become one of us; a more personal experience of His love for me so that I may love Him more tenderly; and a closer union with Jesus in His mission of bringing salvation to humankind.

Reflection: After watching Jesus healing, another great image of Jesus to admire is his preaching: He was a real innovator as well as a really free man! Admire the clarity and purity of Jesus’ message, and his courage in proclaiming it, even though he was well aware of the danger he was courting. Jesus maintains his unyielding focus on the justice of God’s kingdom. He accepts no hypocrisy, no double dealing. He rejects legalistic or ritualistic positions that raise the letter of law above its true spirit.

Jesus promulgates his new alliance, his plan for living, his plan of action for how we, his followers, will help restore this world to what God originally planned for how human beings would treat one another. The famed “Sermon on the Mount” or “the Manifesto of the Kingdom” comes early in Jesus’ ministry. We have heard these words before, but do not let its familiarity detract from its radical appeal. Listening reverently to this discourse I allow the seed of Jesus’ word to be implanted in me and to take root. Imagine yourself sitting among the impoverished people who gathered on a hillside to listen to Jesus comprehensively laying out his path, his “Way.” Then as now, his way is highly counterintuitive; he is inviting us to be and to live for values that are exactly the opposite of what contemporary culture and advertising tell us to do. In His time, Jesus was in contradiction to His world.

Scripture Texts:

Matthew 23: 11-12; 23-24. He who is greatest among you shall be your servant; whoever exalts himself will be humbled, and whoever humbles himself will be exalted.

Matthew 5: 1-48. Seeing the crowds, he went up on the mountain, and when he sat down his disciples came to him. And he opened his mouth and taught them, saying…

John 12:44-50. I gear myself up to listen to Jesus, for when I hear His message, I hear the Father.

Closing Conversation: Make a summary of the things I have meditated on during my prayer, talking to Jesus as a friend talks to a friend. Be candid with him about the things I have just found at this time of prayer. If that is how I feel, ask Him to be accepted under His banner. Finish with the Our Father.

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 15. Alagón – Zaragoza (30,5 km)

Notes: We continue to walk with Jesus, in order to see more Him more clearly, love Him more deeply and follow Him more closely. There is no further need to remind you to say the “introductory prayer” before you begin and throughout the day. Remember also that the final conversation is becoming more and more important as we move into this interior knowledge of Jesus who is strengthening our commitment to life. This is discussed with our “friend” Jesus in our conversation at the end of our prayer and during the day.

Grace: I will ask the Father for three things that I need and that only He can grant: a more intimate knowledge of Jesus who has become one of us; a more personal experience of His love for me so that I may love Him more tenderly; and a closer union with Jesus in His mission of bringing salvation to humankind.

Reflection: After watching Jesus healing, another great image of Jesus to admire is his preaching: He was a real innovator as well as a really free man! Admire the clarity and purity of Jesus’ message, and his courage in proclaiming it, even though he was well aware of the danger he was courting. Jesus maintains his unyielding focus on the justice of God’s kingdom. He accepts no hypocrisy, no double dealing. He rejects legalistic or ritualistic positions that raise the letter of law above its true spirit.

Jesus promulgates his new alliance, his plan for living, his plan of action for how we, his followers, will help restore this world to what God originally planned for how human beings would treat one another. The famed “Sermon on the Mount” or “the Manifesto of the Kingdom” comes early in Jesus’ ministry. We have heard these words before, but do not let its familiarity detract from its radical appeal. Listening reverently to this discourse I allow the seed of Jesus’ word to be implanted in me and to take root. Imagine yourself sitting among the impoverished people who gathered on a hillside to listen to Jesus comprehensively laying out his path, his “Way.” Then as now, his way is highly counterintuitive; he is inviting us to be and to live for values that are exactly the opposite of what contemporary culture and advertising tell us to do. In His time, Jesus was in contradiction to His world.

Scripture Texts:

Matthew 23: 11-12; 23-24. He who is greatest among you shall be your servant; whoever exalts himself will be humbled, and whoever humbles himself will be exalted.

Matthew 5: 1-48. Seeing the crowds, he went up on the mountain, and when he sat down his disciples came to him. And he opened his mouth and taught them, saying…

John 12:44-50. I gear myself up to listen to Jesus, for when I hear His message, I hear the Father.

Closing Conversation: Make a summary of the things I have meditated on during my prayer, talking to Jesus as a friend talks to a friend. Be candid with him about the things I have just found at this time of prayer. If that is how I feel, ask Him to be accepted under His banner. Finish with the Our Father.

Etapa 16

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 16. Zaragoza – Fuentes de Ebro (30,2 km)

Notes: We continue our journey with Jesus, so we may see Him more clearly, love Him more deeply, and follow Him more closely. We now enter into the “third week” of our interior pilgrimage. Remember the “introductory prayer” before beginning prayer as well as during the day. Remember that the final conversation with God at the end of prayer becomes very important. We beg to grow in our interior knowledge of Jesus who strengthens our commitment to life. We discuss all of this with our “friend” Jesus in the dialogue at the end of prayer, as well as throughout the day.

Grace: I beg the Father to draw me closer to Jesus so I may hear and understand His challenge, thrill to the adventure he invites, and ardently desire to serve Him and His people, all the while sharing His lot and His suffering.

Reflections: The gospels tell us that, as Jesus walked along the Sea of Galilee, He called two disciples who were casting their nets into the sea. “Follow me, and I will make you fishers of all people.” They immediately left their nets and followed Him. So mysteriously compelling is this

Jesus, we are told, that two fishermen simply drop their nets, leave the past behind, and follow Jesus toward a new life, a new pilgrimage. We pray to know this Jesus better, and to have deeper insight into the attractiveness of His call. We also beg for a growing desire to be with Jesus, so that an important criterion in my life choices will become less “what would please me,” but rather “what will help me to walk with and to become like Jesus.” Much will be asked of the King’s followers.  There will be the challenge to discover “the one thing necessary” and the “one thing more.” Pondering these challenges, I pay attention to the interior movements that are taking place within me during this pilgrimage. Do I know where I am headed? Does this matter to me?

Scripture:

Luke 9:57-62. I pray not to be a half-hearted follower of Jesus.

Luke 10: 1-9. After this the Lord appointed seventy others, and sent them on ahead of Him.

Luke 10:38-41. Jesus says to me: “One thing alone is required.” My challenge is to include both “Martha and Mary” in my life, as I become the contemplative-in-action whose work for the Lord is animated by constant intimacy with Him.

Mark 10:17-27. As Jesus looks with love on a good man whose life has been a model of goodness and fidelity, Jesus challenges him – as He also challenges me — with these words: “There is one thing more you must do.” I know what He said to the man in the gospel.  I listen now as Jesus tells me in my own heart what one thing more is asked of me.

Final Colloquy: Make a summary of your thoughts in this time of prayer, speaking to Jesus as one friend does with another. Open your heart to Him about what you have discovered within during this pilgrimage. As you are able, invite Jesus to accept you under His banner. End with the “Our Father”.

Zaragoza – Fuentes de Ebro

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 16. Zaragoza – Fuentes de Ebro (30,2 km)

Notes: We continue our journey with Jesus, so we may see Him more clearly, love Him more deeply, and follow Him more closely. We now enter into the “third week” of our interior pilgrimage. Remember the “introductory prayer” before beginning prayer as well as during the day. Remember that the final conversation with God at the end of prayer becomes very important. We beg to grow in our interior knowledge of Jesus who strengthens our commitment to life. We discuss all of this with our “friend” Jesus in the dialogue at the end of prayer, as well as throughout the day.

Grace: I beg the Father to draw me closer to Jesus so I may hear and understand His challenge, thrill to the adventure he invites, and ardently desire to serve Him and His people, all the while sharing His lot and His suffering.

Reflections: The gospels tell us that, as Jesus walked along the Sea of Galilee, He called two disciples who were casting their nets into the sea. “Follow me, and I will make you fishers of all people.” They immediately left their nets and followed Him. So mysteriously compelling is this

Jesus, we are told, that two fishermen simply drop their nets, leave the past behind, and follow Jesus toward a new life, a new pilgrimage. We pray to know this Jesus better, and to have deeper insight into the attractiveness of His call. We also beg for a growing desire to be with Jesus, so that an important criterion in my life choices will become less “what would please me,” but rather “what will help me to walk with and to become like Jesus.” Much will be asked of the King’s followers.  There will be the challenge to discover “the one thing necessary” and the “one thing more.” Pondering these challenges, I pay attention to the interior movements that are taking place within me during this pilgrimage. Do I know where I am headed? Does this matter to me?

Scripture:

Luke 9:57-62. I pray not to be a half-hearted follower of Jesus.

Luke 10: 1-9. After this the Lord appointed seventy others, and sent them on ahead of Him.

Luke 10:38-41. Jesus says to me: “One thing alone is required.” My challenge is to include both “Martha and Mary” in my life, as I become the contemplative-in-action whose work for the Lord is animated by constant intimacy with Him.

Mark 10:17-27. As Jesus looks with love on a good man whose life has been a model of goodness and fidelity, Jesus challenges him – as He also challenges me — with these words: “There is one thing more you must do.” I know what He said to the man in the gospel.  I listen now as Jesus tells me in my own heart what one thing more is asked of me.

Final Colloquy: Make a summary of your thoughts in this time of prayer, speaking to Jesus as one friend does with another. Open your heart to Him about what you have discovered within during this pilgrimage. As you are able, invite Jesus to accept you under His banner. End with the “Our Father”.

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 16. Zaragoza – Fuentes de Ebro (30,2 km)

Notes: We continue our journey with Jesus, so we may see Him more clearly, love Him more deeply, and follow Him more closely. We now enter into the “third week” of our interior pilgrimage. Remember the “introductory prayer” before beginning prayer as well as during the day. Remember that the final conversation with God at the end of prayer becomes very important. We beg to grow in our interior knowledge of Jesus who strengthens our commitment to life. We discuss all of this with our “friend” Jesus in the dialogue at the end of prayer, as well as throughout the day.

Grace: I beg the Father to draw me closer to Jesus so I may hear and understand His challenge, thrill to the adventure he invites, and ardently desire to serve Him and His people, all the while sharing His lot and His suffering.

Reflections: The gospels tell us that, as Jesus walked along the Sea of Galilee, He called two disciples who were casting their nets into the sea. “Follow me, and I will make you fishers of all people.” They immediately left their nets and followed Him. So mysteriously compelling is this

Jesus, we are told, that two fishermen simply drop their nets, leave the past behind, and follow Jesus toward a new life, a new pilgrimage. We pray to know this Jesus better, and to have deeper insight into the attractiveness of His call. We also beg for a growing desire to be with Jesus, so that an important criterion in my life choices will become less “what would please me,” but rather “what will help me to walk with and to become like Jesus.” Much will be asked of the King’s followers.  There will be the challenge to discover “the one thing necessary” and the “one thing more.” Pondering these challenges, I pay attention to the interior movements that are taking place within me during this pilgrimage. Do I know where I am headed? Does this matter to me?

Scripture:

Luke 9:57-62. I pray not to be a half-hearted follower of Jesus.

Luke 10: 1-9. After this the Lord appointed seventy others, and sent them on ahead of Him.

Luke 10:38-41. Jesus says to me: “One thing alone is required.” My challenge is to include both “Martha and Mary” in my life, as I become the contemplative-in-action whose work for the Lord is animated by constant intimacy with Him.

Mark 10:17-27. As Jesus looks with love on a good man whose life has been a model of goodness and fidelity, Jesus challenges him – as He also challenges me — with these words: “There is one thing more you must do.” I know what He said to the man in the gospel.  I listen now as Jesus tells me in my own heart what one thing more is asked of me.

Final Colloquy: Make a summary of your thoughts in this time of prayer, speaking to Jesus as one friend does with another. Open your heart to Him about what you have discovered within during this pilgrimage. As you are able, invite Jesus to accept you under His banner. End with the “Our Father”.

Etapa 17

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 17. Fuentes de Ebro – Venta de Santa Lucía (29,6 km)

Notes: Pay attention to the “introductory prayer.” We are in the “third week” of our Spiritual Exercises. Ignatius invites us to become aware of the growing hardships Jesus encounters in His own “life pilgrimage.” We also enter into a more “arid” part of our pilgrimage. As we do so, keep in mind the cost and courage of Jesus’ commitment for each of us. Our hearts become sad as we walk with Jesus towards Jerusalem for the last time. In our final conversation we enter into this interior under-standing of Jesus who suffers death on the cross even though innocent. We speak of this sadness with our “friend” Jesus during the colloquy at the end of this prayer, as well as throughout the day.

Grace: I beg the Father to draw me closer to Jesus so that I may hear and understand His challenge, thrill to the adventure He invites, and ardently desire to serve Him and His people, all the while sharing His lot and His suffering.

Reflections: In the gospel, Jesus makes a pilgrimage from Galilee to Jerusalem, where He will celebrate the Last Supper and undergo His passion. He has spent nearly three years in the company of His disciples, yet this final journey together shows that they still do not fully grasp His message. They argue, for example, about who will be greatest in God’s kingdom. Jesus tries once again to help them understand that leadership in God’s kingdom involves service to others. They don’t understand – or perhaps can’t bring themselves to hear and accept – that Jesus’ way involves both suffering and sacrifice. Imagine yourself on this long journey to Jerusalem with Jesus. Bring Him your own questions, and pray that your eyes will be open to see his message more clearly, and that your ears will be ever more open to hear his call. Jesus feels weak and tired along His journey. The disciples go fetch food and water, but He stays outside the village. The sun is high and it is hot in Samaria. In John’s gospel Jesus encounters a Samaritan woman – remember that there was deep enmity between Jews and Samaritans. Jesus meets her at a well as she comes to draw water there. Jesus is very thirsty, so He asks the woman for water. In the ensuing conversation the woman comes to know who Jesus is and accepts Him as the Christ, even as she discovers Him as a tired and thirsty man who needs help! Who am I? Who is Jesus? In encountering Jesus, God helps us to understand ourselves more deeply. In the process, we also come to understand God more deeply. The Ignatian journey passes through “Los Monegros,” Spain’s desert-like region. Walking through this hot, arid, and dusty landscape, one can imagine how vital water became in the reality and imagination of Jesus’ listeners. Without food and water, there is no life. Thus we find one of the most evocative and enduring gospel images: Jesus is the water of eternal life, the wellspring that never runs dry, water always abundant. A true personal encounter with Jesus is transforming. It changed this woman’s life, as it transformed the lives of the many disabled people Jesus met. Meet Jesus yourself at the well as this Samaritan woman did. Who am I – really? And who is Jesus for me? What is Jesus asking of me? And what is my response?

Scripture:

Mark 10:32-45. “If anyone would be the first, he must become last of all and servant of all.”

John 4:6-15. “Everyone who drinks of this water will thirst again, but whoever drinks of the water I shall give will never thirst.”

John 6:30-44. I believe that Jesus is living bread and life-giving water. I beg the Father to draw me closer to Jesus so that, eating and drinking with Him, I may have new life.

Final Colloquy: Make a summary of your thoughts during this time of prayer. Speak with Jesus as one friend does with another. Open your heart to Him about what you have discovered within yourself during this pilgrimage. As you are able, invite Jesus to accept you under His banner. Conclude with the “Our Father.”

Fuentes de Ebro – Venta de Santa Lucía

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 17. Fuentes de Ebro – Venta de Santa Lucía (29,6 km)

Notes: Pay attention to the “introductory prayer.” We are in the “third week” of our Spiritual Exercises. Ignatius invites us to become aware of the growing hardships Jesus encounters in His own “life pilgrimage.” We also enter into a more “arid” part of our pilgrimage. As we do so, keep in mind the cost and courage of Jesus’ commitment for each of us. Our hearts become sad as we walk with Jesus towards Jerusalem for the last time. In our final conversation we enter into this interior under-standing of Jesus who suffers death on the cross even though innocent. We speak of this sadness with our “friend” Jesus during the colloquy at the end of this prayer, as well as throughout the day.

Grace: I beg the Father to draw me closer to Jesus so that I may hear and understand His challenge, thrill to the adventure He invites, and ardently desire to serve Him and His people, all the while sharing His lot and His suffering.

Reflections: In the gospel, Jesus makes a pilgrimage from Galilee to Jerusalem, where He will celebrate the Last Supper and undergo His passion. He has spent nearly three years in the company of His disciples, yet this final journey together shows that they still do not fully grasp His message. They argue, for example, about who will be greatest in God’s kingdom. Jesus tries once again to help them understand that leadership in God’s kingdom involves service to others. They don’t understand – or perhaps can’t bring themselves to hear and accept – that Jesus’ way involves both suffering and sacrifice. Imagine yourself on this long journey to Jerusalem with Jesus. Bring Him your own questions, and pray that your eyes will be open to see his message more clearly, and that your ears will be ever more open to hear his call. Jesus feels weak and tired along His journey. The disciples go fetch food and water, but He stays outside the village. The sun is high and it is hot in Samaria. In John’s gospel Jesus encounters a Samaritan woman – remember that there was deep enmity between Jews and Samaritans. Jesus meets her at a well as she comes to draw water there. Jesus is very thirsty, so He asks the woman for water. In the ensuing conversation the woman comes to know who Jesus is and accepts Him as the Christ, even as she discovers Him as a tired and thirsty man who needs help! Who am I? Who is Jesus? In encountering Jesus, God helps us to understand ourselves more deeply. In the process, we also come to understand God more deeply. The Ignatian journey passes through “Los Monegros,” Spain’s desert-like region. Walking through this hot, arid, and dusty landscape, one can imagine how vital water became in the reality and imagination of Jesus’ listeners. Without food and water, there is no life. Thus we find one of the most evocative and enduring gospel images: Jesus is the water of eternal life, the wellspring that never runs dry, water always abundant. A true personal encounter with Jesus is transforming. It changed this woman’s life, as it transformed the lives of the many disabled people Jesus met. Meet Jesus yourself at the well as this Samaritan woman did. Who am I – really? And who is Jesus for me? What is Jesus asking of me? And what is my response?

Scripture:

Mark 10:32-45. “If anyone would be the first, he must become last of all and servant of all.”

John 4:6-15. “Everyone who drinks of this water will thirst again, but whoever drinks of the water I shall give will never thirst.”

John 6:30-44. I believe that Jesus is living bread and life-giving water. I beg the Father to draw me closer to Jesus so that, eating and drinking with Him, I may have new life.

Final Colloquy: Make a summary of your thoughts during this time of prayer. Speak with Jesus as one friend does with another. Open your heart to Him about what you have discovered within yourself during this pilgrimage. As you are able, invite Jesus to accept you under His banner. Conclude with the “Our Father.”

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 17. Fuentes de Ebro – Venta de Santa Lucía (29,6 km)

Notes: Pay attention to the “introductory prayer.” We are in the “third week” of our Spiritual Exercises. Ignatius invites us to become aware of the growing hardships Jesus encounters in His own “life pilgrimage.” We also enter into a more “arid” part of our pilgrimage. As we do so, keep in mind the cost and courage of Jesus’ commitment for each of us. Our hearts become sad as we walk with Jesus towards Jerusalem for the last time. In our final conversation we enter into this interior under-standing of Jesus who suffers death on the cross even though innocent. We speak of this sadness with our “friend” Jesus during the colloquy at the end of this prayer, as well as throughout the day.

Grace: I beg the Father to draw me closer to Jesus so that I may hear and understand His challenge, thrill to the adventure He invites, and ardently desire to serve Him and His people, all the while sharing His lot and His suffering.

Reflections: In the gospel, Jesus makes a pilgrimage from Galilee to Jerusalem, where He will celebrate the Last Supper and undergo His passion. He has spent nearly three years in the company of His disciples, yet this final journey together shows that they still do not fully grasp His message. They argue, for example, about who will be greatest in God’s kingdom. Jesus tries once again to help them understand that leadership in God’s kingdom involves service to others. They don’t understand – or perhaps can’t bring themselves to hear and accept – that Jesus’ way involves both suffering and sacrifice. Imagine yourself on this long journey to Jerusalem with Jesus. Bring Him your own questions, and pray that your eyes will be open to see his message more clearly, and that your ears will be ever more open to hear his call. Jesus feels weak and tired along His journey. The disciples go fetch food and water, but He stays outside the village. The sun is high and it is hot in Samaria. In John’s gospel Jesus encounters a Samaritan woman – remember that there was deep enmity between Jews and Samaritans. Jesus meets her at a well as she comes to draw water there. Jesus is very thirsty, so He asks the woman for water. In the ensuing conversation the woman comes to know who Jesus is and accepts Him as the Christ, even as she discovers Him as a tired and thirsty man who needs help! Who am I? Who is Jesus? In encountering Jesus, God helps us to understand ourselves more deeply. In the process, we also come to understand God more deeply. The Ignatian journey passes through “Los Monegros,” Spain’s desert-like region. Walking through this hot, arid, and dusty landscape, one can imagine how vital water became in the reality and imagination of Jesus’ listeners. Without food and water, there is no life. Thus we find one of the most evocative and enduring gospel images: Jesus is the water of eternal life, the wellspring that never runs dry, water always abundant. A true personal encounter with Jesus is transforming. It changed this woman’s life, as it transformed the lives of the many disabled people Jesus met. Meet Jesus yourself at the well as this Samaritan woman did. Who am I – really? And who is Jesus for me? What is Jesus asking of me? And what is my response?

Scripture:

Mark 10:32-45. “If anyone would be the first, he must become last of all and servant of all.”

John 4:6-15. “Everyone who drinks of this water will thirst again, but whoever drinks of the water I shall give will never thirst.”

John 6:30-44. I believe that Jesus is living bread and life-giving water. I beg the Father to draw me closer to Jesus so that, eating and drinking with Him, I may have new life.

Final Colloquy: Make a summary of your thoughts during this time of prayer. Speak with Jesus as one friend does with another. Open your heart to Him about what you have discovered within yourself during this pilgrimage. As you are able, invite Jesus to accept you under His banner. Conclude with the “Our Father.”

Etapa 18

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 18. Venta de Santa Lucía – Bujaraloz (21,3 km)

Notes: We walk with Jesus in His ascent to the Cross. Do not neglect the “introductory prayer”: now more than ever we ask that our lives be directed to God’s will, our only source of salvation and happiness. Recall that the final colloquy is very important: we enter deeply into an inner knowledge of the suffering Jesus who strengthens our personal life commitments. We discuss all this with our “friend” in the colloquy at the end of the prayer, as well as during the day.

Grace: I ask the Father for this gift: to feel sorrow with Christ in sorrow; to experience anguish with Christ’s own anguish; and even to experience tears and deep grief because of all the afflictions Christ endures for me at the end of His life.

Reflections: After so many days walking with Jesus, we know already that His life is in danger. He knows this as well, even though people don’t understand. The Kingdom of God is fighting for survival, but the enemy is powerful. As the prophet said, our hearts are made of stone and we are not prepared to change this. Our hearts are tough to break into. In the core of our being we even feel that the tender merciful heart of God is not attractive. Jesus confronts us about this, but we don’t want to hear. Jesus feels angry but He cannot change our hearts. As His disciple I feel awkward in this situation. I don’t understand either and feel tired. Jesus sees me and asks me to go with Him and relax. Things are not going to be easier in Jerusalem.

In Jerusalem Jesus celebrates His last supper on earth with His disciples. Through a powerful, almost shocking gesture, Jesus reinforces again the servant nature of leadership in God’s kingdom. Jesus, the Lord, takes upon Himself a household servant’s task by washing the dirty feet of the supper guests. Can you imagine Jesus washing your feet? During the meal, Jesus breaks bread and shares wine with his disciples, inviting them to “do this in memory of me.” Picture in how many places and by how many varied peoples throughout history this moment of Eucharist has been repeated over the past two millennia. It is not only the manner in which Christians remember Jesus. The Eucharist also draws us into a living, intimate connection with Jesus: the bread and wine Jesus offers us is actually His own body and blood, generously give to each of us.

Recall that Ignatius invites us to pray by mentally inserting ourselves into the various scenes as they unfold, filling in the blanks of the basic gospel stories. The passion narratives especially lend themselves to this type of contemplative prayer.For example, regarding the Last Supper, Ignatius speaks to us of Jesus who, “after eating the Paschal lamb and finishing the meal, washed their feet and gave his most holy Body and Precious Blood to his disciples.” Ignatius says further: “See the persons at the supper, and then, as I reflect on myself, draw profit from them. Listen to what they are saying….see what they are doing.”

Scripture:

Mark 8:34-38. “Anyone who wants to be my follower must renounce self. Then he must take up his cross and follow me.”

Matthew 11:2-30. Only the simple can recognize the Messiah. The world can’t understand. With my heart longing for companionship and intimacy, I welcome the invitation of Jesus to share His rest as He shares my burden. I ardently desire to give myself totally to the love and service of Jesus and His people.

Matthew 26: 26-31. As they were eating, Jesus took bread and He blessed and broke it, and gave it to the disciples saying, “Take, eat; this is my body.”

John: 13:1-17. When He had washed their feet and taken His garments, He resumed His place and said to them, “Do you know what I have done for you?”

Colloquy: As in human situations of taking care of the sick and dying, our personal presence is often more important than our faltering words or awkward actions. It is the same as we follow Jesus Christ in word and action. We previously described the colloquy as an intimate conversation between friends. Expand that description now to include the depth of feeling, love, and compassion which allows us just to be present with Jesus. Ask Him once more, as you wish, to be accepted under His banner, the standard of the Cross. End with the “Our Father.”

Venta de Santa Lucía – Bujaraloz

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 18. Venta de Santa Lucía – Bujaraloz (21,3 km)

Notes: We walk with Jesus in His ascent to the Cross. Do not neglect the “introductory prayer”: now more than ever we ask that our lives be directed to God’s will, our only source of salvation and happiness. Recall that the final colloquy is very important: we enter deeply into an inner knowledge of the suffering Jesus who strengthens our personal life commitments. We discuss all this with our “friend” in the colloquy at the end of the prayer, as well as during the day.

Grace: I ask the Father for this gift: to feel sorrow with Christ in sorrow; to experience anguish with Christ’s own anguish; and even to experience tears and deep grief because of all the afflictions Christ endures for me at the end of His life.

Reflections: After so many days walking with Jesus, we know already that His life is in danger. He knows this as well, even though people don’t understand. The Kingdom of God is fighting for survival, but the enemy is powerful. As the prophet said, our hearts are made of stone and we are not prepared to change this. Our hearts are tough to break into. In the core of our being we even feel that the tender merciful heart of God is not attractive. Jesus confronts us about this, but we don’t want to hear. Jesus feels angry but He cannot change our hearts. As His disciple I feel awkward in this situation. I don’t understand either and feel tired. Jesus sees me and asks me to go with Him and relax. Things are not going to be easier in Jerusalem.

In Jerusalem Jesus celebrates His last supper on earth with His disciples. Through a powerful, almost shocking gesture, Jesus reinforces again the servant nature of leadership in God’s kingdom. Jesus, the Lord, takes upon Himself a household servant’s task by washing the dirty feet of the supper guests. Can you imagine Jesus washing your feet? During the meal, Jesus breaks bread and shares wine with his disciples, inviting them to “do this in memory of me.” Picture in how many places and by how many varied peoples throughout history this moment of Eucharist has been repeated over the past two millennia. It is not only the manner in which Christians remember Jesus. The Eucharist also draws us into a living, intimate connection with Jesus: the bread and wine Jesus offers us is actually His own body and blood, generously give to each of us.

Recall that Ignatius invites us to pray by mentally inserting ourselves into the various scenes as they unfold, filling in the blanks of the basic gospel stories. The passion narratives especially lend themselves to this type of contemplative prayer.For example, regarding the Last Supper, Ignatius speaks to us of Jesus who, “after eating the Paschal lamb and finishing the meal, washed their feet and gave his most holy Body and Precious Blood to his disciples.” Ignatius says further: “See the persons at the supper, and then, as I reflect on myself, draw profit from them. Listen to what they are saying….see what they are doing.”

Scripture:

Mark 8:34-38. “Anyone who wants to be my follower must renounce self. Then he must take up his cross and follow me.”

Matthew 11:2-30. Only the simple can recognize the Messiah. The world can’t understand. With my heart longing for companionship and intimacy, I welcome the invitation of Jesus to share His rest as He shares my burden. I ardently desire to give myself totally to the love and service of Jesus and His people.

Matthew 26: 26-31. As they were eating, Jesus took bread and He blessed and broke it, and gave it to the disciples saying, “Take, eat; this is my body.”

John: 13:1-17. When He had washed their feet and taken His garments, He resumed His place and said to them, “Do you know what I have done for you?”

Colloquy: As in human situations of taking care of the sick and dying, our personal presence is often more important than our faltering words or awkward actions. It is the same as we follow Jesus Christ in word and action. We previously described the colloquy as an intimate conversation between friends. Expand that description now to include the depth of feeling, love, and compassion which allows us just to be present with Jesus. Ask Him once more, as you wish, to be accepted under His banner, the standard of the Cross. End with the “Our Father.”

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 18. Venta de Santa Lucía – Bujaraloz (21,3 km)

Notes: We walk with Jesus in His ascent to the Cross. Do not neglect the “introductory prayer”: now more than ever we ask that our lives be directed to God’s will, our only source of salvation and happiness. Recall that the final colloquy is very important: we enter deeply into an inner knowledge of the suffering Jesus who strengthens our personal life commitments. We discuss all this with our “friend” in the colloquy at the end of the prayer, as well as during the day.

Grace: I ask the Father for this gift: to feel sorrow with Christ in sorrow; to experience anguish with Christ’s own anguish; and even to experience tears and deep grief because of all the afflictions Christ endures for me at the end of His life.

Reflections: After so many days walking with Jesus, we know already that His life is in danger. He knows this as well, even though people don’t understand. The Kingdom of God is fighting for survival, but the enemy is powerful. As the prophet said, our hearts are made of stone and we are not prepared to change this. Our hearts are tough to break into. In the core of our being we even feel that the tender merciful heart of God is not attractive. Jesus confronts us about this, but we don’t want to hear. Jesus feels angry but He cannot change our hearts. As His disciple I feel awkward in this situation. I don’t understand either and feel tired. Jesus sees me and asks me to go with Him and relax. Things are not going to be easier in Jerusalem.

In Jerusalem Jesus celebrates His last supper on earth with His disciples. Through a powerful, almost shocking gesture, Jesus reinforces again the servant nature of leadership in God’s kingdom. Jesus, the Lord, takes upon Himself a household servant’s task by washing the dirty feet of the supper guests. Can you imagine Jesus washing your feet? During the meal, Jesus breaks bread and shares wine with his disciples, inviting them to “do this in memory of me.” Picture in how many places and by how many varied peoples throughout history this moment of Eucharist has been repeated over the past two millennia. It is not only the manner in which Christians remember Jesus. The Eucharist also draws us into a living, intimate connection with Jesus: the bread and wine Jesus offers us is actually His own body and blood, generously give to each of us.

Recall that Ignatius invites us to pray by mentally inserting ourselves into the various scenes as they unfold, filling in the blanks of the basic gospel stories. The passion narratives especially lend themselves to this type of contemplative prayer.For example, regarding the Last Supper, Ignatius speaks to us of Jesus who, “after eating the Paschal lamb and finishing the meal, washed their feet and gave his most holy Body and Precious Blood to his disciples.” Ignatius says further: “See the persons at the supper, and then, as I reflect on myself, draw profit from them. Listen to what they are saying….see what they are doing.”

Scripture:

Mark 8:34-38. “Anyone who wants to be my follower must renounce self. Then he must take up his cross and follow me.”

Matthew 11:2-30. Only the simple can recognize the Messiah. The world can’t understand. With my heart longing for companionship and intimacy, I welcome the invitation of Jesus to share His rest as He shares my burden. I ardently desire to give myself totally to the love and service of Jesus and His people.

Matthew 26: 26-31. As they were eating, Jesus took bread and He blessed and broke it, and gave it to the disciples saying, “Take, eat; this is my body.”

John: 13:1-17. When He had washed their feet and taken His garments, He resumed His place and said to them, “Do you know what I have done for you?”

Colloquy: As in human situations of taking care of the sick and dying, our personal presence is often more important than our faltering words or awkward actions. It is the same as we follow Jesus Christ in word and action. We previously described the colloquy as an intimate conversation between friends. Expand that description now to include the depth of feeling, love, and compassion which allows us just to be present with Jesus. Ask Him once more, as you wish, to be accepted under His banner, the standard of the Cross. End with the “Our Father.”

Etapa 19

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 19. Bujaraloz – Candasnos (21 km)

Notes: We walk with Jesus on the way to His death. Pay attention to the “introductory prayer”: we ask once again that our lives be directed to the will of God, the only source of our happiness and Resurrection. Recall that the final colloquy is very important: we draw closer to the suffering Jesus and ask Him to strengthen us for our personal life commitments. Make this colloquy at the end of the prayer and often during the day.

Grace: I as the Father for this gift: to feel sorrow with Christ in sorrow; to experience anguish with Christ in anguish; and even to experience tears and interior grief because of all the sufferings Christ endures for me at the end of His life.

Reflections: After His last supper, Jesus experiences agony while praying in the garden. He seems to wish that he could avoid the suffering He is about to undergo. He is betrayed by Judas. He is abandoned by the very friends and disciples who had been his closest companions for the last three years. He is publicly humiliated. His life mission seems to end in failure and ridicule. None of this is an “act.” Christians do believe that Jesus, though always God, actually became “fully human” in nature. Thus this particular moment reveals Jesus’ total solidarity with the human condition. Each of us suffers humiliation, rejection, doubt, as well as our own personal agonies. While inserting yourself into this narrative, pray to experience great solidarity with Jesus and great compassion for Him. Take special note of Jesus’ ultimate and utter faithfulness to His mission, to His Father, and, by extension, to us. Jesus is the one who remains faithful to what He is called to accomplish. He also remains faithful to each of us in our personal moments of grief, pain, and uncertainty.

Use the Ignatian contemplation as you follow Jesus with the disciples to Gethsemane. Stay with them as they wait for Jesus. Or just go there and watch Jesus praying to His Father. We follow Jesus in embracing the Father’s will, experiencing His humiliation, darkness, and doubt. Look at Judas arriving with astonishment and pride, not really understanding the role he is playing. Feel the emotion of this situation. Stay close to Jesus in the house of Caiaphas. Keep your eyes on Jesus: What is He feeling? What is He thinking? How does He respond in this moment? Stay close to Jesus and look at the people who are speaking. What are they saying? What do you feel in this moment? Move forward and follow Peter outside of the house. Watch Jesus here since He knows that Peter will betray Him. Experience the pain of betrayal through some sign of affection. Notice how Jesus regards Peter. Jesus has been denied by the very one whom Jesus had called “Rock” – this is the lot of Jesus which I am invited to share. For me this is a moment of personal truth – How do I feel?

Scripture:

Matthew 26:30-75. “ Then Jesus came to the disciples and said to them: ‘Still asleep? Still resting? The hour has come!’”

Isaiah 42:1-9. “Here is my servant whom I uphold.”

Psalm 54. “Save me, God!”

Colloquy: We stay with Jesus, just as we did yesterday. Our presence is more important than any of our faltering words or awkward actions. We bring our personal depth of feeling, love, and compassion into our prayer. This allows us to accompany Jesus at a greater depth. End with the “Our Father.”

Bujaraloz – Candasnos

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 19. Bujaraloz – Candasnos (21 km)

Notes: We walk with Jesus on the way to His death. Pay attention to the “introductory prayer”: we ask once again that our lives be directed to the will of God, the only source of our happiness and Resurrection. Recall that the final colloquy is very important: we draw closer to the suffering Jesus and ask Him to strengthen us for our personal life commitments. Make this colloquy at the end of the prayer and often during the day.

Grace: I as the Father for this gift: to feel sorrow with Christ in sorrow; to experience anguish with Christ in anguish; and even to experience tears and interior grief because of all the sufferings Christ endures for me at the end of His life.

Reflections: After His last supper, Jesus experiences agony while praying in the garden. He seems to wish that he could avoid the suffering He is about to undergo. He is betrayed by Judas. He is abandoned by the very friends and disciples who had been his closest companions for the last three years. He is publicly humiliated. His life mission seems to end in failure and ridicule. None of this is an “act.” Christians do believe that Jesus, though always God, actually became “fully human” in nature. Thus this particular moment reveals Jesus’ total solidarity with the human condition. Each of us suffers humiliation, rejection, doubt, as well as our own personal agonies. While inserting yourself into this narrative, pray to experience great solidarity with Jesus and great compassion for Him. Take special note of Jesus’ ultimate and utter faithfulness to His mission, to His Father, and, by extension, to us. Jesus is the one who remains faithful to what He is called to accomplish. He also remains faithful to each of us in our personal moments of grief, pain, and uncertainty.

Use the Ignatian contemplation as you follow Jesus with the disciples to Gethsemane. Stay with them as they wait for Jesus. Or just go there and watch Jesus praying to His Father. We follow Jesus in embracing the Father’s will, experiencing His humiliation, darkness, and doubt. Look at Judas arriving with astonishment and pride, not really understanding the role he is playing. Feel the emotion of this situation. Stay close to Jesus in the house of Caiaphas. Keep your eyes on Jesus: What is He feeling? What is He thinking? How does He respond in this moment? Stay close to Jesus and look at the people who are speaking. What are they saying? What do you feel in this moment? Move forward and follow Peter outside of the house. Watch Jesus here since He knows that Peter will betray Him. Experience the pain of betrayal through some sign of affection. Notice how Jesus regards Peter. Jesus has been denied by the very one whom Jesus had called “Rock” – this is the lot of Jesus which I am invited to share. For me this is a moment of personal truth – How do I feel?

Scripture:

Matthew 26:30-75. “ Then Jesus came to the disciples and said to them: ‘Still asleep? Still resting? The hour has come!’”

Isaiah 42:1-9. “Here is my servant whom I uphold.”

Psalm 54. “Save me, God!”

Colloquy: We stay with Jesus, just as we did yesterday. Our presence is more important than any of our faltering words or awkward actions. We bring our personal depth of feeling, love, and compassion into our prayer. This allows us to accompany Jesus at a greater depth. End with the “Our Father.”

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 19. Bujaraloz – Candasnos (21 km)

Notes: We walk with Jesus on the way to His death. Pay attention to the “introductory prayer”: we ask once again that our lives be directed to the will of God, the only source of our happiness and Resurrection. Recall that the final colloquy is very important: we draw closer to the suffering Jesus and ask Him to strengthen us for our personal life commitments. Make this colloquy at the end of the prayer and often during the day.

Grace: I as the Father for this gift: to feel sorrow with Christ in sorrow; to experience anguish with Christ in anguish; and even to experience tears and interior grief because of all the sufferings Christ endures for me at the end of His life.

Reflections: After His last supper, Jesus experiences agony while praying in the garden. He seems to wish that he could avoid the suffering He is about to undergo. He is betrayed by Judas. He is abandoned by the very friends and disciples who had been his closest companions for the last three years. He is publicly humiliated. His life mission seems to end in failure and ridicule. None of this is an “act.” Christians do believe that Jesus, though always God, actually became “fully human” in nature. Thus this particular moment reveals Jesus’ total solidarity with the human condition. Each of us suffers humiliation, rejection, doubt, as well as our own personal agonies. While inserting yourself into this narrative, pray to experience great solidarity with Jesus and great compassion for Him. Take special note of Jesus’ ultimate and utter faithfulness to His mission, to His Father, and, by extension, to us. Jesus is the one who remains faithful to what He is called to accomplish. He also remains faithful to each of us in our personal moments of grief, pain, and uncertainty.

Use the Ignatian contemplation as you follow Jesus with the disciples to Gethsemane. Stay with them as they wait for Jesus. Or just go there and watch Jesus praying to His Father. We follow Jesus in embracing the Father’s will, experiencing His humiliation, darkness, and doubt. Look at Judas arriving with astonishment and pride, not really understanding the role he is playing. Feel the emotion of this situation. Stay close to Jesus in the house of Caiaphas. Keep your eyes on Jesus: What is He feeling? What is He thinking? How does He respond in this moment? Stay close to Jesus and look at the people who are speaking. What are they saying? What do you feel in this moment? Move forward and follow Peter outside of the house. Watch Jesus here since He knows that Peter will betray Him. Experience the pain of betrayal through some sign of affection. Notice how Jesus regards Peter. Jesus has been denied by the very one whom Jesus had called “Rock” – this is the lot of Jesus which I am invited to share. For me this is a moment of personal truth – How do I feel?

Scripture:

Matthew 26:30-75. “ Then Jesus came to the disciples and said to them: ‘Still asleep? Still resting? The hour has come!’”

Isaiah 42:1-9. “Here is my servant whom I uphold.”

Psalm 54. “Save me, God!”

Colloquy: We stay with Jesus, just as we did yesterday. Our presence is more important than any of our faltering words or awkward actions. We bring our personal depth of feeling, love, and compassion into our prayer. This allows us to accompany Jesus at a greater depth. End with the “Our Father.”

Etapa 20

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 20. Candasnos – Fraga (26,8 km)

Notes: We walk with Jesus, accompanying Him in His final moments as the disciples take his Body down from the cross for burial. Take time with the “introductory prayer”: once again we ask that our lives be always directed to God’s will, the only source of our happiness and Resurrection. Remember that the final colloquy is always important: we draw closer to the suffering Jesus and ask Him to give us strength for our personal life commitments. Make the colloquy at the end of the prayer, and often during the day.

Grace: I ask the Father for this gift: to feel sorrow with Christ in sorrow; to experience anguish with Christ in anguish; and even to experience tears and profound grief because of the suffering Jesus endures at the end of His life for my sake.

Reflections: The crucifix, suspended over the altar of every Catholic Church, reminds us that the Mass is a remembrance and re-living of Jesus’ own offering of Himself for each of us – Jesus poured out for us, unto death. At times we can over-intellectualize the crucifixion, pondering the theological mystery of Jesus’ death. Sometimes we have changed the Crucifixion into a “golden cross,” even with gemstones. We are invited these days to “keep it real.” In your imagination spend time with the human Jesus who died a painful, slow, and humiliating death, hanging between two criminals. Spend time beside His mother, who had to watch her son die. We current-day Christians know that this drama ends in Jesus’ resurrection. Mary and the apostles did not. In my Ignatian contemplation, I accompany Mary, Jesus’ mother, as she moves away from the tomb, back to the house where she is staying. I stay with her. I wait with her. I listen to her as she shares with me all those realities she has pondered in her heart. I listen to her memories of her Son. I weep with her; I hope with her. And I tell her who I am – a companion and follower of her Son! Ignatius invites us to identify as closely as possible with Jesus, by experiencing “sorrow with Christ in sorrow”: a broken spirit with Christ also so broken. And interior strain because of the great suffering which Christ endured for me. Consider also Our Lady’s personal loneliness, along with her deep grief and fatigue. I can also ponder the fatigue of the disciples. Everything has finished. It is the end.

Christ our Lord and King continues to labor in our world to save all men and women. Jesus continues to be tortured in His brothers and sisters. He continues to be led to His cross. Take some moments of reflection about the situation of our personal humanity. Ask the Father to place you with Christ crucified in the world today.

Scripture:

Matthew 27:1-66. “Crucify him!” “Why, what harm has he done?” “Crucify him!”

Psalm 22. “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”

Psalm 31. “In you, Lord, I have found refuge.”

Isaiah 50:4-9. “The Lord God is my helper.”

Final Colloquy: We spend time with Jesus, just as we did yesterday. Our personal presence is worth more than any faltering words or awkward actions. We experience in our colloquy the depth of feeling, love, and compassion which allows us simply to walk with Jesus in His suffering. Conclude with the “Our Father.”

Candasnos – Fraga

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 20. Candasnos – Fraga (26,8 km)

Notes: We walk with Jesus, accompanying Him in His final moments as the disciples take his Body down from the cross for burial. Take time with the “introductory prayer”: once again we ask that our lives be always directed to God’s will, the only source of our happiness and Resurrection. Remember that the final colloquy is always important: we draw closer to the suffering Jesus and ask Him to give us strength for our personal life commitments. Make the colloquy at the end of the prayer, and often during the day.

Grace: I ask the Father for this gift: to feel sorrow with Christ in sorrow; to experience anguish with Christ in anguish; and even to experience tears and profound grief because of the suffering Jesus endures at the end of His life for my sake.

Reflections: The crucifix, suspended over the altar of every Catholic Church, reminds us that the Mass is a remembrance and re-living of Jesus’ own offering of Himself for each of us – Jesus poured out for us, unto death. At times we can over-intellectualize the crucifixion, pondering the theological mystery of Jesus’ death. Sometimes we have changed the Crucifixion into a “golden cross,” even with gemstones. We are invited these days to “keep it real.” In your imagination spend time with the human Jesus who died a painful, slow, and humiliating death, hanging between two criminals. Spend time beside His mother, who had to watch her son die. We current-day Christians know that this drama ends in Jesus’ resurrection. Mary and the apostles did not. In my Ignatian contemplation, I accompany Mary, Jesus’ mother, as she moves away from the tomb, back to the house where she is staying. I stay with her. I wait with her. I listen to her as she shares with me all those realities she has pondered in her heart. I listen to her memories of her Son. I weep with her; I hope with her. And I tell her who I am – a companion and follower of her Son! Ignatius invites us to identify as closely as possible with Jesus, by experiencing “sorrow with Christ in sorrow”: a broken spirit with Christ also so broken. And interior strain because of the great suffering which Christ endured for me. Consider also Our Lady’s personal loneliness, along with her deep grief and fatigue. I can also ponder the fatigue of the disciples. Everything has finished. It is the end.

Christ our Lord and King continues to labor in our world to save all men and women. Jesus continues to be tortured in His brothers and sisters. He continues to be led to His cross. Take some moments of reflection about the situation of our personal humanity. Ask the Father to place you with Christ crucified in the world today.

Scripture:

Matthew 27:1-66. “Crucify him!” “Why, what harm has he done?” “Crucify him!”

Psalm 22. “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”

Psalm 31. “In you, Lord, I have found refuge.”

Isaiah 50:4-9. “The Lord God is my helper.”

Final Colloquy: We spend time with Jesus, just as we did yesterday. Our personal presence is worth more than any faltering words or awkward actions. We experience in our colloquy the depth of feeling, love, and compassion which allows us simply to walk with Jesus in His suffering. Conclude with the “Our Father.”

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 20. Candasnos – Fraga (26,8 km)

Notes: We walk with Jesus, accompanying Him in His final moments as the disciples take his Body down from the cross for burial. Take time with the “introductory prayer”: once again we ask that our lives be always directed to God’s will, the only source of our happiness and Resurrection. Remember that the final colloquy is always important: we draw closer to the suffering Jesus and ask Him to give us strength for our personal life commitments. Make the colloquy at the end of the prayer, and often during the day.

Grace: I ask the Father for this gift: to feel sorrow with Christ in sorrow; to experience anguish with Christ in anguish; and even to experience tears and profound grief because of the suffering Jesus endures at the end of His life for my sake.

Reflections: The crucifix, suspended over the altar of every Catholic Church, reminds us that the Mass is a remembrance and re-living of Jesus’ own offering of Himself for each of us – Jesus poured out for us, unto death. At times we can over-intellectualize the crucifixion, pondering the theological mystery of Jesus’ death. Sometimes we have changed the Crucifixion into a “golden cross,” even with gemstones. We are invited these days to “keep it real.” In your imagination spend time with the human Jesus who died a painful, slow, and humiliating death, hanging between two criminals. Spend time beside His mother, who had to watch her son die. We current-day Christians know that this drama ends in Jesus’ resurrection. Mary and the apostles did not. In my Ignatian contemplation, I accompany Mary, Jesus’ mother, as she moves away from the tomb, back to the house where she is staying. I stay with her. I wait with her. I listen to her as she shares with me all those realities she has pondered in her heart. I listen to her memories of her Son. I weep with her; I hope with her. And I tell her who I am – a companion and follower of her Son! Ignatius invites us to identify as closely as possible with Jesus, by experiencing “sorrow with Christ in sorrow”: a broken spirit with Christ also so broken. And interior strain because of the great suffering which Christ endured for me. Consider also Our Lady’s personal loneliness, along with her deep grief and fatigue. I can also ponder the fatigue of the disciples. Everything has finished. It is the end.

Christ our Lord and King continues to labor in our world to save all men and women. Jesus continues to be tortured in His brothers and sisters. He continues to be led to His cross. Take some moments of reflection about the situation of our personal humanity. Ask the Father to place you with Christ crucified in the world today.

Scripture:

Matthew 27:1-66. “Crucify him!” “Why, what harm has he done?” “Crucify him!”

Psalm 22. “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”

Psalm 31. “In you, Lord, I have found refuge.”

Isaiah 50:4-9. “The Lord God is my helper.”

Final Colloquy: We spend time with Jesus, just as we did yesterday. Our personal presence is worth more than any faltering words or awkward actions. We experience in our colloquy the depth of feeling, love, and compassion which allows us simply to walk with Jesus in His suffering. Conclude with the “Our Father.”

Etapa 21

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 21. Fraga – Lleida (33 km)

Notes: We now enter the final stage of our pilgrimage: the “fourth week” of the Spiritual Exercises. The mood shifts as we now enter into the contemplation of God’s life in all its fullness. We experience with Jesus and the disciples that the final door has been opened. There is nothing that can stop us now in our journey to freedom and eternal happiness in the Love of God. This final week is a time full of grace and light. We rejoice in each small flower, bird, smile, and extended hand. Remember the “introductory prayer” as you enter into prayer; use it as well throughout the day. Pay attention to the final colloquy: we draw closer into this interior knowledge of the risen Jesus who strengthens our commitment to life forever. We discuss this desire with our “friend” Jesus at the end of the prayer and as the day moves along.

Grace: I ask the Father for this gift: to enter fully into the joy of the risen and victorious Christ. To be able to grasp the fullness of life that Jesus has achieved for us. To rejoice deeply with Christ, with Mary, and all his disciples.

Reflections: Today and in the days to follow, Ignatius invites us to “ask for the grace to be glad and to rejoice intensely because of the great glory and joy of Christ our Lord” who is risen from the dead. No one could imagine what was going to happen, even though Isaiah the prophet had already announced that “My servant will prosper; he will be raised high and greatly exalted.” But the last days of Jesus were so hard to endure. His death was so incomprehensible that it was impossible to imagine how God was still present. Everyone was perplexed and demoralized. More than once throughout the Bible a barren, elderly woman found herself with child unbelievably, against all odds. Yes, Scripture writers remind us that “nothing is impossible with God.” Yet it was still hard to believe: even though the guards explained all the details to the chief priests and the elders, nobody accepted their story. But today we believe that the resurrection is the ultimate truth of God’s extraordinary power and goodness. God has the power to liberate us from death, every kind of death.

Sometimes our faith is all too weak. The God who transformed Jesus from death to life can surely transform us as well. Still we are often tempted to feel discouraged and even hopeless in the face of whatever problems, fears, sinfulness, or grief take hold of us. The risen Jesus is transformed forever; by this same fact, each of us is also transformed interiorly since we hold the seed of Resurrection within us. Jesus is alive and with us forever, even though we sometimes find it hard to believe it. The disciples going to Emmaus got that message. It is also the experience of Mary, the mother of Christ. She understood from the very beginning that Jesus was alive. As Ignatius tells us: she was certainly the first person to experience the His Resurrection. And from that moment she draws closer to the disciples, helping them overcome their own sadness and disappointment. Yes, the Risen Lord is with us as He promised, consoling us and offering His gifts, so that we in turn may console those suffering throughout the world.

When the women approached the empty tomb, unable to accept the possibility that Jesus had risen, the watchman simply says: “Why do you look for the living among the dead?” The same is said to us: too often we cannot believe the good news about ourselves and our world. Once again Jesus confounds our expectations in so many ways! Today we recognize that the Risen Jesus does not show himself first to the apostles like Peter, Matthew or John, but rather to the women, the most courageous and faithful of all the disciples.

In this contemplation let us enter inside the scene personally and experience vividly Jesus’ resurrection from death. I listen, I observe, I speak, I entreat, I touch…I am actually inside the event. We pray for the resurrection of every death within us and among all those we love. Today Mary understands us very well!

Scripture:

Isaiah 52:13-53:12. “Who could have believed what we have heard?”

Matthew 28:1-15. “Do not be afraid; I know that you seek Jesus who was crucified. He is not here; he has been raised, [just as he promised.]”

Luke 24:13-35. Jesus, my companion all along this pilgrimage, explains to me how He has been part of my history and even my pre-history. Consoled in this way, I want to proclaim to others just as the Emmaus disciples did: “The Lord has been raised!”

Final Colloquy: At this point in our inner pilgrimage, we are already accustomed to walk with our friend and Lord Jesus Christ, speaking freely as one friend does to another. If in your heart you feel the strength and grace to do so, invite Jesus to accept you for service under His banner, joining at His side to build the Kingdom of God. Conclude with the “Our Father.”

Fraga – Lleida

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 21. Fraga – Lleida (33 km)

Notes: We now enter the final stage of our pilgrimage: the “fourth week” of the Spiritual Exercises. The mood shifts as we now enter into the contemplation of God’s life in all its fullness. We experience with Jesus and the disciples that the final door has been opened. There is nothing that can stop us now in our journey to freedom and eternal happiness in the Love of God. This final week is a time full of grace and light. We rejoice in each small flower, bird, smile, and extended hand. Remember the “introductory prayer” as you enter into prayer; use it as well throughout the day. Pay attention to the final colloquy: we draw closer into this interior knowledge of the risen Jesus who strengthens our commitment to life forever. We discuss this desire with our “friend” Jesus at the end of the prayer and as the day moves along.

Grace: I ask the Father for this gift: to enter fully into the joy of the risen and victorious Christ. To be able to grasp the fullness of life that Jesus has achieved for us. To rejoice deeply with Christ, with Mary, and all his disciples.

Reflections: Today and in the days to follow, Ignatius invites us to “ask for the grace to be glad and to rejoice intensely because of the great glory and joy of Christ our Lord” who is risen from the dead. No one could imagine what was going to happen, even though Isaiah the prophet had already announced that “My servant will prosper; he will be raised high and greatly exalted.” But the last days of Jesus were so hard to endure. His death was so incomprehensible that it was impossible to imagine how God was still present. Everyone was perplexed and demoralized. More than once throughout the Bible a barren, elderly woman found herself with child unbelievably, against all odds. Yes, Scripture writers remind us that “nothing is impossible with God.” Yet it was still hard to believe: even though the guards explained all the details to the chief priests and the elders, nobody accepted their story. But today we believe that the resurrection is the ultimate truth of God’s extraordinary power and goodness. God has the power to liberate us from death, every kind of death.

Sometimes our faith is all too weak. The God who transformed Jesus from death to life can surely transform us as well. Still we are often tempted to feel discouraged and even hopeless in the face of whatever problems, fears, sinfulness, or grief take hold of us. The risen Jesus is transformed forever; by this same fact, each of us is also transformed interiorly since we hold the seed of Resurrection within us. Jesus is alive and with us forever, even though we sometimes find it hard to believe it. The disciples going to Emmaus got that message. It is also the experience of Mary, the mother of Christ. She understood from the very beginning that Jesus was alive. As Ignatius tells us: she was certainly the first person to experience the His Resurrection. And from that moment she draws closer to the disciples, helping them overcome their own sadness and disappointment. Yes, the Risen Lord is with us as He promised, consoling us and offering His gifts, so that we in turn may console those suffering throughout the world.

When the women approached the empty tomb, unable to accept the possibility that Jesus had risen, the watchman simply says: “Why do you look for the living among the dead?” The same is said to us: too often we cannot believe the good news about ourselves and our world. Once again Jesus confounds our expectations in so many ways! Today we recognize that the Risen Jesus does not show himself first to the apostles like Peter, Matthew or John, but rather to the women, the most courageous and faithful of all the disciples.

In this contemplation let us enter inside the scene personally and experience vividly Jesus’ resurrection from death. I listen, I observe, I speak, I entreat, I touch…I am actually inside the event. We pray for the resurrection of every death within us and among all those we love. Today Mary understands us very well!

Scripture:

Isaiah 52:13-53:12. “Who could have believed what we have heard?”

Matthew 28:1-15. “Do not be afraid; I know that you seek Jesus who was crucified. He is not here; he has been raised, [just as he promised.]”

Luke 24:13-35. Jesus, my companion all along this pilgrimage, explains to me how He has been part of my history and even my pre-history. Consoled in this way, I want to proclaim to others just as the Emmaus disciples did: “The Lord has been raised!”

Final Colloquy: At this point in our inner pilgrimage, we are already accustomed to walk with our friend and Lord Jesus Christ, speaking freely as one friend does to another. If in your heart you feel the strength and grace to do so, invite Jesus to accept you for service under His banner, joining at His side to build the Kingdom of God. Conclude with the “Our Father.”

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 21. Fraga – Lleida (33 km)

Notes: We now enter the final stage of our pilgrimage: the “fourth week” of the Spiritual Exercises. The mood shifts as we now enter into the contemplation of God’s life in all its fullness. We experience with Jesus and the disciples that the final door has been opened. There is nothing that can stop us now in our journey to freedom and eternal happiness in the Love of God. This final week is a time full of grace and light. We rejoice in each small flower, bird, smile, and extended hand. Remember the “introductory prayer” as you enter into prayer; use it as well throughout the day. Pay attention to the final colloquy: we draw closer into this interior knowledge of the risen Jesus who strengthens our commitment to life forever. We discuss this desire with our “friend” Jesus at the end of the prayer and as the day moves along.

Grace: I ask the Father for this gift: to enter fully into the joy of the risen and victorious Christ. To be able to grasp the fullness of life that Jesus has achieved for us. To rejoice deeply with Christ, with Mary, and all his disciples.

Reflections: Today and in the days to follow, Ignatius invites us to “ask for the grace to be glad and to rejoice intensely because of the great glory and joy of Christ our Lord” who is risen from the dead. No one could imagine what was going to happen, even though Isaiah the prophet had already announced that “My servant will prosper; he will be raised high and greatly exalted.” But the last days of Jesus were so hard to endure. His death was so incomprehensible that it was impossible to imagine how God was still present. Everyone was perplexed and demoralized. More than once throughout the Bible a barren, elderly woman found herself with child unbelievably, against all odds. Yes, Scripture writers remind us that “nothing is impossible with God.” Yet it was still hard to believe: even though the guards explained all the details to the chief priests and the elders, nobody accepted their story. But today we believe that the resurrection is the ultimate truth of God’s extraordinary power and goodness. God has the power to liberate us from death, every kind of death.

Sometimes our faith is all too weak. The God who transformed Jesus from death to life can surely transform us as well. Still we are often tempted to feel discouraged and even hopeless in the face of whatever problems, fears, sinfulness, or grief take hold of us. The risen Jesus is transformed forever; by this same fact, each of us is also transformed interiorly since we hold the seed of Resurrection within us. Jesus is alive and with us forever, even though we sometimes find it hard to believe it. The disciples going to Emmaus got that message. It is also the experience of Mary, the mother of Christ. She understood from the very beginning that Jesus was alive. As Ignatius tells us: she was certainly the first person to experience the His Resurrection. And from that moment she draws closer to the disciples, helping them overcome their own sadness and disappointment. Yes, the Risen Lord is with us as He promised, consoling us and offering His gifts, so that we in turn may console those suffering throughout the world.

When the women approached the empty tomb, unable to accept the possibility that Jesus had risen, the watchman simply says: “Why do you look for the living among the dead?” The same is said to us: too often we cannot believe the good news about ourselves and our world. Once again Jesus confounds our expectations in so many ways! Today we recognize that the Risen Jesus does not show himself first to the apostles like Peter, Matthew or John, but rather to the women, the most courageous and faithful of all the disciples.

In this contemplation let us enter inside the scene personally and experience vividly Jesus’ resurrection from death. I listen, I observe, I speak, I entreat, I touch…I am actually inside the event. We pray for the resurrection of every death within us and among all those we love. Today Mary understands us very well!

Scripture:

Isaiah 52:13-53:12. “Who could have believed what we have heard?”

Matthew 28:1-15. “Do not be afraid; I know that you seek Jesus who was crucified. He is not here; he has been raised, [just as he promised.]”

Luke 24:13-35. Jesus, my companion all along this pilgrimage, explains to me how He has been part of my history and even my pre-history. Consoled in this way, I want to proclaim to others just as the Emmaus disciples did: “The Lord has been raised!”

Final Colloquy: At this point in our inner pilgrimage, we are already accustomed to walk with our friend and Lord Jesus Christ, speaking freely as one friend does to another. If in your heart you feel the strength and grace to do so, invite Jesus to accept you for service under His banner, joining at His side to build the Kingdom of God. Conclude with the “Our Father.”

Etapa 22

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 22. Lleida – Palau d'Anglesola (25,7 km)

Notes: Throughout the “fourth week” of the Spiritual Exercises we keep up the same positive spirit, especially because we now contemplate God’s life in all its fullness. There is nothing that can hinder our journey to freedom and eternal happiness since we are grounded in God’s love. Live this final week filled with grace and light. We rejoice in every flower, bird, smile, and shaken hand. Remember the “introductory prayer” before each prayer period, and continue it during the day. Pay attention to the final colloquy: we enter into the interior knowledge of the risen Jesus who strengthens our commitment to eternal life. This we discuss with our “friend” Jesus in the colloquy at the end of prayer as well as during the day.

Grace: I ask the Father for this gift: to be able to enter into the joy of the risen and victorious Christ. To contemplate the fullness of life that Jesus has achieved for us. To rejoice deeply with Christ, with Mary, and all his disciples.

Reflections: We focus our contemplation today on the wonder of the Resurrection. It took the disciples many days to understand the experience of Jesus’ full risen Life. Stay close to Mary Magdalene, the woman who loved Jesus so deeply. Experience her distress. Try to feel as she did, once she has lost the only purpose for her life. And be there with her at the moment of her discovery. The world rejoices with her. Feel the fear and guilt of the disciples when the risen Jesus returns to the upper room where they used to gather together. See the place and be one of them. Experience the wonder of the Resurrection.

Jesus comes today to our personal desperation, to that dark room where we have enclosed our most difficult moments. He wants to heal all our personal deaths and losses, restoring us to life. Jesus no longer permits our suffering. He is Life and He wants to release us from our personal tomb. Listen to the voice of Jesus calling you to come forth as Lazarus did. Be conscious of His presence walking with you and telling you: “awake from your death for I am indeed alive!”

As always, Ignatius invites us to put ourselves inside these incredible scenes. Allow these familiar resurrection stories to play out within your own heart as you put yourself into the scene. Make use of nature’s many delights to help you. As Ignatius wrote his Spiritual Exercises he no doubt recalled the most enjoyable days of his pilgrimage to Montserrat, and everything there that brought him joy. In this fourth week, “I will make use of light and the pleasant features of the seasons, like refreshing coolness in summer or the sun’s warmth in winter, as far as I think or imagine that this will help me rejoice in Christ my Creator and redeemer.”

Scripture:

John 20:11-18. With Mary Magdalene I hear my own name, and respond with joy.

John 20: 19-23. The fear, guilt, and confusion of Jesus’ ten companions in the upper room are familiar since I have felt them all. It is into just such a personal place that He wants and needs to come. I welcome Him and receive His gifts: peace, joy, mission, His life-giving Spirit, His forgiving heart.

John 11:17-44. Jesus said: “I am the Resurrection and the life…do you believe this?” Jesus called: “Lazarus, come out!” Lazarus heard himself called from death to life, from being bound up to being set free. Lying on the ledge in the tomb, I ponder my own small deaths and all that limits my freedom.

Final colloquy: At this stage of our inner pilgrimage, we are accustomed to walk with our friend and Lord Jesus Christ, speaking freely as one friend does to another. If you honestly feel the strength and grace to do so, invite Jesus to accept you under His banner, and thus to build God’s Kingdom at His side. Finish with the “Our Father.”

Lleida – Palau d'Anglesola

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 22. Lleida – Palau d'Anglesola (25,7 km)

Notes: Throughout the “fourth week” of the Spiritual Exercises we keep up the same positive spirit, especially because we now contemplate God’s life in all its fullness. There is nothing that can hinder our journey to freedom and eternal happiness since we are grounded in God’s love. Live this final week filled with grace and light. We rejoice in every flower, bird, smile, and shaken hand. Remember the “introductory prayer” before each prayer period, and continue it during the day. Pay attention to the final colloquy: we enter into the interior knowledge of the risen Jesus who strengthens our commitment to eternal life. This we discuss with our “friend” Jesus in the colloquy at the end of prayer as well as during the day.

Grace: I ask the Father for this gift: to be able to enter into the joy of the risen and victorious Christ. To contemplate the fullness of life that Jesus has achieved for us. To rejoice deeply with Christ, with Mary, and all his disciples.

Reflections: We focus our contemplation today on the wonder of the Resurrection. It took the disciples many days to understand the experience of Jesus’ full risen Life. Stay close to Mary Magdalene, the woman who loved Jesus so deeply. Experience her distress. Try to feel as she did, once she has lost the only purpose for her life. And be there with her at the moment of her discovery. The world rejoices with her. Feel the fear and guilt of the disciples when the risen Jesus returns to the upper room where they used to gather together. See the place and be one of them. Experience the wonder of the Resurrection.

Jesus comes today to our personal desperation, to that dark room where we have enclosed our most difficult moments. He wants to heal all our personal deaths and losses, restoring us to life. Jesus no longer permits our suffering. He is Life and He wants to release us from our personal tomb. Listen to the voice of Jesus calling you to come forth as Lazarus did. Be conscious of His presence walking with you and telling you: “awake from your death for I am indeed alive!”

As always, Ignatius invites us to put ourselves inside these incredible scenes. Allow these familiar resurrection stories to play out within your own heart as you put yourself into the scene. Make use of nature’s many delights to help you. As Ignatius wrote his Spiritual Exercises he no doubt recalled the most enjoyable days of his pilgrimage to Montserrat, and everything there that brought him joy. In this fourth week, “I will make use of light and the pleasant features of the seasons, like refreshing coolness in summer or the sun’s warmth in winter, as far as I think or imagine that this will help me rejoice in Christ my Creator and redeemer.”

Scripture:

John 20:11-18. With Mary Magdalene I hear my own name, and respond with joy.

John 20: 19-23. The fear, guilt, and confusion of Jesus’ ten companions in the upper room are familiar since I have felt them all. It is into just such a personal place that He wants and needs to come. I welcome Him and receive His gifts: peace, joy, mission, His life-giving Spirit, His forgiving heart.

John 11:17-44. Jesus said: “I am the Resurrection and the life…do you believe this?” Jesus called: “Lazarus, come out!” Lazarus heard himself called from death to life, from being bound up to being set free. Lying on the ledge in the tomb, I ponder my own small deaths and all that limits my freedom.

Final colloquy: At this stage of our inner pilgrimage, we are accustomed to walk with our friend and Lord Jesus Christ, speaking freely as one friend does to another. If you honestly feel the strength and grace to do so, invite Jesus to accept you under His banner, and thus to build God’s Kingdom at His side. Finish with the “Our Father.”

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 22. Lleida – Palau d'Anglesola (25,7 km)

Notes: Throughout the “fourth week” of the Spiritual Exercises we keep up the same positive spirit, especially because we now contemplate God’s life in all its fullness. There is nothing that can hinder our journey to freedom and eternal happiness since we are grounded in God’s love. Live this final week filled with grace and light. We rejoice in every flower, bird, smile, and shaken hand. Remember the “introductory prayer” before each prayer period, and continue it during the day. Pay attention to the final colloquy: we enter into the interior knowledge of the risen Jesus who strengthens our commitment to eternal life. This we discuss with our “friend” Jesus in the colloquy at the end of prayer as well as during the day.

Grace: I ask the Father for this gift: to be able to enter into the joy of the risen and victorious Christ. To contemplate the fullness of life that Jesus has achieved for us. To rejoice deeply with Christ, with Mary, and all his disciples.

Reflections: We focus our contemplation today on the wonder of the Resurrection. It took the disciples many days to understand the experience of Jesus’ full risen Life. Stay close to Mary Magdalene, the woman who loved Jesus so deeply. Experience her distress. Try to feel as she did, once she has lost the only purpose for her life. And be there with her at the moment of her discovery. The world rejoices with her. Feel the fear and guilt of the disciples when the risen Jesus returns to the upper room where they used to gather together. See the place and be one of them. Experience the wonder of the Resurrection.

Jesus comes today to our personal desperation, to that dark room where we have enclosed our most difficult moments. He wants to heal all our personal deaths and losses, restoring us to life. Jesus no longer permits our suffering. He is Life and He wants to release us from our personal tomb. Listen to the voice of Jesus calling you to come forth as Lazarus did. Be conscious of His presence walking with you and telling you: “awake from your death for I am indeed alive!”

As always, Ignatius invites us to put ourselves inside these incredible scenes. Allow these familiar resurrection stories to play out within your own heart as you put yourself into the scene. Make use of nature’s many delights to help you. As Ignatius wrote his Spiritual Exercises he no doubt recalled the most enjoyable days of his pilgrimage to Montserrat, and everything there that brought him joy. In this fourth week, “I will make use of light and the pleasant features of the seasons, like refreshing coolness in summer or the sun’s warmth in winter, as far as I think or imagine that this will help me rejoice in Christ my Creator and redeemer.”

Scripture:

John 20:11-18. With Mary Magdalene I hear my own name, and respond with joy.

John 20: 19-23. The fear, guilt, and confusion of Jesus’ ten companions in the upper room are familiar since I have felt them all. It is into just such a personal place that He wants and needs to come. I welcome Him and receive His gifts: peace, joy, mission, His life-giving Spirit, His forgiving heart.

John 11:17-44. Jesus said: “I am the Resurrection and the life…do you believe this?” Jesus called: “Lazarus, come out!” Lazarus heard himself called from death to life, from being bound up to being set free. Lying on the ledge in the tomb, I ponder my own small deaths and all that limits my freedom.

Final colloquy: At this stage of our inner pilgrimage, we are accustomed to walk with our friend and Lord Jesus Christ, speaking freely as one friend does to another. If you honestly feel the strength and grace to do so, invite Jesus to accept you under His banner, and thus to build God’s Kingdom at His side. Finish with the “Our Father.”

Etapa 23

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 23. Palau d'Anglesola – Verdú (24,7 km)

Notes: We maintain the same positive spirit as we continue to contemplate the life of God in all its fullness. There is nothing that can hinder us on our path to freedom and eternal happiness in God’s love. Live this last week full of grace and full of light. We rejoice in every flower, bird, smile, extended hand. Remember the “introductory prayer” as we enter into prayer, as well as throughout the day. Pay attention to the final colloquy: we ask an interior knowledge of the risen Jesus who strengthens our commitment to life eternal. We discuss this with our “friend” Jesus in the colloquy at the end of prayer, and during the day. At this point, pay attention to the Ignatian tips referring to St. Peter Claver. Peter Claver was a follower of Jesus Christ and a Jesuit missionary in Latin America; he was often called the “slave of slaves.”

Grace: I beg the Father for this gift: to enter into the joy of the risen and victorious Christ. To be able to contemplate the fullness of life that Jesus has achieved for us. I ask to rejoice deeply with Christ, and to be sent into the world to serve the mission of Jesus Christ.

Reflections: The grace of being alive, the grace of experiencing the resurrection within you is not just a personal gift. Rather, with great energy, this grace must be shared with others and placed at the service of Jesus’ Mission: to spread the Good News of the Kingdom of God. Today we feel renewed as in the same moment we commit ourselves with Jesus, our best “friend,” to help realize His mission on earth. The Father continues to pour out the Spirit of Christ upon the men and women of our day. Jesus consoles us always and sends us forth on mission to console the suffering, the poor, and all who long for salvation. As it is written: “When you send forth your spirit, they are created, and you renew the face of the earth. (Psalm 104:30). We pray today to our God that we may enter into the joy and consoling mission of the Risen Jesus.

In Matthew’s gospel we find Jesus asking the disciples to go to Galilee and assist him there. The disciples were those sinners He had invited to become His companions, the same ones who were traitors at the very end. We are now one with them, as disciples in our pilgrimage to the Kingdom. We are also united with others, perhaps more sinful or more faithful than ourselves. But this doesn’t really matter since our strength and wisdom is centered in Christ. Do not be afraid to answer His call. We gather now at the mountain, that meeting place between God and His people. For us this place can be a slum, a lab, a church, a clinic, an office, a parlor, a classroom. Jesus gives us our mission: go forth, baptize, teach, love, and bring God’s Compassion as reconciliation for all of humanity. We are invited to fulfill this mission in every moment and circumstance of life. And Jesus speaks the most wonderful words to us: He promises that He will be with us always, in each joyful and painful moment. Even though I may not feel worthy to accept His presence, Jesus will always stay close to me. Even if I am a sinful person, unfaithful and limited, Jesus is going to send His Spirit to transform every human situation as an experience of growth.

Even though our faith may be small, Jesus counts on us. Thomas had to recognize his lack of faith before being sent to the world. We pray to answer the call of Jesus, inviting us to follow him to the beach and stay with Him. We join the disciples there in receiving His commission and His blessing.

Scripture:

Matthew 28: 16-20: “I will be with you always, until the end of time.”

John 20: 24-29: Tolerant of my darkness and unbelief as He was of Thomas, Jesus delights in consoling me with the gift of renewed faith. In His loving presence, I say: “My Lord and my God!”

John 21: 1-17: A moment of joy – “It is the Lord!” A moment of companionship – “Come and eat your meal.” A moment of intimacy and decision – “Do you love me?” A moment of mission – “Feed my sheep!”

Final Colloquy: At this point in our interior pilgrimage, we are accustomed to walk with our friend and Lord Jesus Christ, speaking freely just as one friend does with another. If you honestly experience the strength and grace within you, beg Jesus to accept you under His banner, thus to build the Kingdom of God at His side. Finish with the “Our Father.”

Palau d'Anglesola – Verdú

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 23. Palau d'Anglesola – Verdú (24,7 km)

Notes: We maintain the same positive spirit as we continue to contemplate the life of God in all its fullness. There is nothing that can hinder us on our path to freedom and eternal happiness in God’s love. Live this last week full of grace and full of light. We rejoice in every flower, bird, smile, extended hand. Remember the “introductory prayer” as we enter into prayer, as well as throughout the day. Pay attention to the final colloquy: we ask an interior knowledge of the risen Jesus who strengthens our commitment to life eternal. We discuss this with our “friend” Jesus in the colloquy at the end of prayer, and during the day. At this point, pay attention to the Ignatian tips referring to St. Peter Claver. Peter Claver was a follower of Jesus Christ and a Jesuit missionary in Latin America; he was often called the “slave of slaves.”

Grace: I beg the Father for this gift: to enter into the joy of the risen and victorious Christ. To be able to contemplate the fullness of life that Jesus has achieved for us. I ask to rejoice deeply with Christ, and to be sent into the world to serve the mission of Jesus Christ.

Reflections: The grace of being alive, the grace of experiencing the resurrection within you is not just a personal gift. Rather, with great energy, this grace must be shared with others and placed at the service of Jesus’ Mission: to spread the Good News of the Kingdom of God. Today we feel renewed as in the same moment we commit ourselves with Jesus, our best “friend,” to help realize His mission on earth. The Father continues to pour out the Spirit of Christ upon the men and women of our day. Jesus consoles us always and sends us forth on mission to console the suffering, the poor, and all who long for salvation. As it is written: “When you send forth your spirit, they are created, and you renew the face of the earth. (Psalm 104:30). We pray today to our God that we may enter into the joy and consoling mission of the Risen Jesus.

In Matthew’s gospel we find Jesus asking the disciples to go to Galilee and assist him there. The disciples were those sinners He had invited to become His companions, the same ones who were traitors at the very end. We are now one with them, as disciples in our pilgrimage to the Kingdom. We are also united with others, perhaps more sinful or more faithful than ourselves. But this doesn’t really matter since our strength and wisdom is centered in Christ. Do not be afraid to answer His call. We gather now at the mountain, that meeting place between God and His people. For us this place can be a slum, a lab, a church, a clinic, an office, a parlor, a classroom. Jesus gives us our mission: go forth, baptize, teach, love, and bring God’s Compassion as reconciliation for all of humanity. We are invited to fulfill this mission in every moment and circumstance of life. And Jesus speaks the most wonderful words to us: He promises that He will be with us always, in each joyful and painful moment. Even though I may not feel worthy to accept His presence, Jesus will always stay close to me. Even if I am a sinful person, unfaithful and limited, Jesus is going to send His Spirit to transform every human situation as an experience of growth.

Even though our faith may be small, Jesus counts on us. Thomas had to recognize his lack of faith before being sent to the world. We pray to answer the call of Jesus, inviting us to follow him to the beach and stay with Him. We join the disciples there in receiving His commission and His blessing.

Scripture:

Matthew 28: 16-20: “I will be with you always, until the end of time.”

John 20: 24-29: Tolerant of my darkness and unbelief as He was of Thomas, Jesus delights in consoling me with the gift of renewed faith. In His loving presence, I say: “My Lord and my God!”

John 21: 1-17: A moment of joy – “It is the Lord!” A moment of companionship – “Come and eat your meal.” A moment of intimacy and decision – “Do you love me?” A moment of mission – “Feed my sheep!”

Final Colloquy: At this point in our interior pilgrimage, we are accustomed to walk with our friend and Lord Jesus Christ, speaking freely just as one friend does with another. If you honestly experience the strength and grace within you, beg Jesus to accept you under His banner, thus to build the Kingdom of God at His side. Finish with the “Our Father.”

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 23. Palau d'Anglesola – Verdú (24,7 km)

Notes: We maintain the same positive spirit as we continue to contemplate the life of God in all its fullness. There is nothing that can hinder us on our path to freedom and eternal happiness in God’s love. Live this last week full of grace and full of light. We rejoice in every flower, bird, smile, extended hand. Remember the “introductory prayer” as we enter into prayer, as well as throughout the day. Pay attention to the final colloquy: we ask an interior knowledge of the risen Jesus who strengthens our commitment to life eternal. We discuss this with our “friend” Jesus in the colloquy at the end of prayer, and during the day. At this point, pay attention to the Ignatian tips referring to St. Peter Claver. Peter Claver was a follower of Jesus Christ and a Jesuit missionary in Latin America; he was often called the “slave of slaves.”

Grace: I beg the Father for this gift: to enter into the joy of the risen and victorious Christ. To be able to contemplate the fullness of life that Jesus has achieved for us. I ask to rejoice deeply with Christ, and to be sent into the world to serve the mission of Jesus Christ.

Reflections: The grace of being alive, the grace of experiencing the resurrection within you is not just a personal gift. Rather, with great energy, this grace must be shared with others and placed at the service of Jesus’ Mission: to spread the Good News of the Kingdom of God. Today we feel renewed as in the same moment we commit ourselves with Jesus, our best “friend,” to help realize His mission on earth. The Father continues to pour out the Spirit of Christ upon the men and women of our day. Jesus consoles us always and sends us forth on mission to console the suffering, the poor, and all who long for salvation. As it is written: “When you send forth your spirit, they are created, and you renew the face of the earth. (Psalm 104:30). We pray today to our God that we may enter into the joy and consoling mission of the Risen Jesus.

In Matthew’s gospel we find Jesus asking the disciples to go to Galilee and assist him there. The disciples were those sinners He had invited to become His companions, the same ones who were traitors at the very end. We are now one with them, as disciples in our pilgrimage to the Kingdom. We are also united with others, perhaps more sinful or more faithful than ourselves. But this doesn’t really matter since our strength and wisdom is centered in Christ. Do not be afraid to answer His call. We gather now at the mountain, that meeting place between God and His people. For us this place can be a slum, a lab, a church, a clinic, an office, a parlor, a classroom. Jesus gives us our mission: go forth, baptize, teach, love, and bring God’s Compassion as reconciliation for all of humanity. We are invited to fulfill this mission in every moment and circumstance of life. And Jesus speaks the most wonderful words to us: He promises that He will be with us always, in each joyful and painful moment. Even though I may not feel worthy to accept His presence, Jesus will always stay close to me. Even if I am a sinful person, unfaithful and limited, Jesus is going to send His Spirit to transform every human situation as an experience of growth.

Even though our faith may be small, Jesus counts on us. Thomas had to recognize his lack of faith before being sent to the world. We pray to answer the call of Jesus, inviting us to follow him to the beach and stay with Him. We join the disciples there in receiving His commission and His blessing.

Scripture:

Matthew 28: 16-20: “I will be with you always, until the end of time.”

John 20: 24-29: Tolerant of my darkness and unbelief as He was of Thomas, Jesus delights in consoling me with the gift of renewed faith. In His loving presence, I say: “My Lord and my God!”

John 21: 1-17: A moment of joy – “It is the Lord!” A moment of companionship – “Come and eat your meal.” A moment of intimacy and decision – “Do you love me?” A moment of mission – “Feed my sheep!”

Final Colloquy: At this point in our interior pilgrimage, we are accustomed to walk with our friend and Lord Jesus Christ, speaking freely just as one friend does with another. If you honestly experience the strength and grace within you, beg Jesus to accept you under His banner, thus to build the Kingdom of God at His side. Finish with the “Our Father.”

Etapa 24

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 24. Verdú – Cervera (17 km)

Notes: Although we meditate today about Jesus’ temptations, we keep our same positive spirit, since we continue to contemplate the life of God in all its fullness. Nothing can deter us on our journey to freedom and eternal happiness in the love of God. Remember the “introductory prayer” as well as the final colloquy at the end of the prayer and throughout the day. And rejoice in Christ’s Resurrection! Light, flowers, water, and friends are all welcome!

Grace: I pray to rejoice deeply with Christ since I am now sent into the world to serve His mission. I pray that I can recognize the deceits of Evil and guard myself against them, as Jesus did in the full confidence of God’s Love.

Reflections: Yesterday we were called to return to Galilee, to our “regular life” and usual habits. We have a mission: to work for the Kingdom. Today we consider the beginning of Jesus’ mission and the discernment He went through before beginning His work. The purpose of this meditation is to gain insight into the strategies of Jesus and of the Evil One, knowing that we are called to work for the Kingdom in our ordinary daily living. How will you use your power, gifts, talents, and resources? This is the fundamental question of Jesus’ temptation in the desert.

We are told that the Evil One showed Jesus all the kingdoms of the world and said, “All these I will give you, if you will fall down and worship me.” The answer was: “You shall worship the Lord your God, and Him alone shall you serve.” This moment of crisis in the wilderness is the same moment of crisis that we all face constantly. Can we restrain our desires and wanton need for praise, adulation, power, and comfort? Will our lives be all about using our talents to serve ourselves, or will our lives focus on contributing to society and the world we have inherited?

Call to mind the temptations that beset you. Realize that Jesus -fully human like you- may likewise have suffered any of these same temptations, shameful as they may be. Jesus’ solution to temptation was to recognize it and to rely totally on God. In the same way, we can bring our temptations to Jesus, proclaiming our confidence in Him. Let’s pray that we find ourselves so close to Jesus that we want to choose what He chooses.

As we already said, Jesus doesn’t choose “perfect men and women” to become His disciples. He knows us pretty well. Understanding the kind of persons Jesus chose, Ignatius invites us to ponder first “how they came from a rude and lowly condition of living, and then to realize the dignity to which they were so gently called.” This is our mystery as well: we are born very low, yet called to such lofty service. Temptation is at our door. It is normal.

Ignatius proposes a meditation on three kinds of response to Jesus’ invitation to follow this mission. Ignatius challenges us to reflect on just what it means to find that true spiritual freedom to embrace Jesus’ mission. We are speaking about true freedom, freedom that brings about God’s action in the world. All of us experience attractions that can get in the way of our serving God within the world: we may love money, sex, power, our good looks, appearing well-clothed, having great cars or other stuff. Some folks have good intentions, but they never manage to change their ways of living until the day before their death. Others, deep down, know that something is not quite right, but they keep finding excuses and rationalizations to keep doing the same thing, and even try to convince God that it is really not that bad. Others are free: they can be rich and well-satisfied, if this is God’s will and for God’s service. But they can also be happy and poor, giving up what they are involved with. They can graciously accept prestige insofar as it helps serve Jesus’ mission, but they don’t crave and chase prestige for its own sake, and can easily live without it.

It is entirely human to have attachments which collapse our freedom May we be able to accept graciously any prestige that helps to serve the mission of our King. At the same time may we not shrink from persecution or loss of prestige, if this will produce some greater good and allow us live without positions of power. Perhaps it is sufficient for today’s meditation to simply recognize such harmful attachments and to avoid them. For this grace we beg for God’s light.

Scripture:

Matthew 4: 1-11. The tactics of his adversary are not to tempt Jesus to evil, but rather to become a Messiah of possessions, prestige and power instead of a Messiah of poverty, persecution and powerlessness, as the Father called Him to be.

Ecclesiastes 3:1-22. Humans cannot understand God’s ways. Thus we should definitely stay close to Him. Since everything has its own time, I should hold onto the times of God in my life.

Proverbs 3:1-12. Put your loyalty and faith in God and you will never fail.

Wisdom 3:1-12. Those who trust in God will understand that His Truth is real, and the faithful will abide with God in Love.

Matthew 6:24-34. No one can serve two masters; either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve both God and material wealth.

Final Colloquy: At this stage of our inner journey, we are accustomed to walk with our friend and Lord Jesus Christ, speaking freely with Him as one friend does with another. If you honestly experience the strength and grace within you, invite Jesus to accept you under His banner, joining at His side to build the Kingdom of God. Conclude with the “Our Father.”

Verdú – Cervera

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 24. Verdú – Cervera (17 km)

Notes: Although we meditate today about Jesus’ temptations, we keep our same positive spirit, since we continue to contemplate the life of God in all its fullness. Nothing can deter us on our journey to freedom and eternal happiness in the love of God. Remember the “introductory prayer” as well as the final colloquy at the end of the prayer and throughout the day. And rejoice in Christ’s Resurrection! Light, flowers, water, and friends are all welcome!

Grace: I pray to rejoice deeply with Christ since I am now sent into the world to serve His mission. I pray that I can recognize the deceits of Evil and guard myself against them, as Jesus did in the full confidence of God’s Love.

Reflections: Yesterday we were called to return to Galilee, to our “regular life” and usual habits. We have a mission: to work for the Kingdom. Today we consider the beginning of Jesus’ mission and the discernment He went through before beginning His work. The purpose of this meditation is to gain insight into the strategies of Jesus and of the Evil One, knowing that we are called to work for the Kingdom in our ordinary daily living. How will you use your power, gifts, talents, and resources? This is the fundamental question of Jesus’ temptation in the desert.

We are told that the Evil One showed Jesus all the kingdoms of the world and said, “All these I will give you, if you will fall down and worship me.” The answer was: “You shall worship the Lord your God, and Him alone shall you serve.” This moment of crisis in the wilderness is the same moment of crisis that we all face constantly. Can we restrain our desires and wanton need for praise, adulation, power, and comfort? Will our lives be all about using our talents to serve ourselves, or will our lives focus on contributing to society and the world we have inherited?

Call to mind the temptations that beset you. Realize that Jesus -fully human like you- may likewise have suffered any of these same temptations, shameful as they may be. Jesus’ solution to temptation was to recognize it and to rely totally on God. In the same way, we can bring our temptations to Jesus, proclaiming our confidence in Him. Let’s pray that we find ourselves so close to Jesus that we want to choose what He chooses.

As we already said, Jesus doesn’t choose “perfect men and women” to become His disciples. He knows us pretty well. Understanding the kind of persons Jesus chose, Ignatius invites us to ponder first “how they came from a rude and lowly condition of living, and then to realize the dignity to which they were so gently called.” This is our mystery as well: we are born very low, yet called to such lofty service. Temptation is at our door. It is normal.

Ignatius proposes a meditation on three kinds of response to Jesus’ invitation to follow this mission. Ignatius challenges us to reflect on just what it means to find that true spiritual freedom to embrace Jesus’ mission. We are speaking about true freedom, freedom that brings about God’s action in the world. All of us experience attractions that can get in the way of our serving God within the world: we may love money, sex, power, our good looks, appearing well-clothed, having great cars or other stuff. Some folks have good intentions, but they never manage to change their ways of living until the day before their death. Others, deep down, know that something is not quite right, but they keep finding excuses and rationalizations to keep doing the same thing, and even try to convince God that it is really not that bad. Others are free: they can be rich and well-satisfied, if this is God’s will and for God’s service. But they can also be happy and poor, giving up what they are involved with. They can graciously accept prestige insofar as it helps serve Jesus’ mission, but they don’t crave and chase prestige for its own sake, and can easily live without it.

It is entirely human to have attachments which collapse our freedom May we be able to accept graciously any prestige that helps to serve the mission of our King. At the same time may we not shrink from persecution or loss of prestige, if this will produce some greater good and allow us live without positions of power. Perhaps it is sufficient for today’s meditation to simply recognize such harmful attachments and to avoid them. For this grace we beg for God’s light.

Scripture:

Matthew 4: 1-11. The tactics of his adversary are not to tempt Jesus to evil, but rather to become a Messiah of possessions, prestige and power instead of a Messiah of poverty, persecution and powerlessness, as the Father called Him to be.

Ecclesiastes 3:1-22. Humans cannot understand God’s ways. Thus we should definitely stay close to Him. Since everything has its own time, I should hold onto the times of God in my life.

Proverbs 3:1-12. Put your loyalty and faith in God and you will never fail.

Wisdom 3:1-12. Those who trust in God will understand that His Truth is real, and the faithful will abide with God in Love.

Matthew 6:24-34. No one can serve two masters; either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve both God and material wealth.

Final Colloquy: At this stage of our inner journey, we are accustomed to walk with our friend and Lord Jesus Christ, speaking freely with Him as one friend does with another. If you honestly experience the strength and grace within you, invite Jesus to accept you under His banner, joining at His side to build the Kingdom of God. Conclude with the “Our Father.”

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 24. Verdú – Cervera (17 km)

Notes: Although we meditate today about Jesus’ temptations, we keep our same positive spirit, since we continue to contemplate the life of God in all its fullness. Nothing can deter us on our journey to freedom and eternal happiness in the love of God. Remember the “introductory prayer” as well as the final colloquy at the end of the prayer and throughout the day. And rejoice in Christ’s Resurrection! Light, flowers, water, and friends are all welcome!

Grace: I pray to rejoice deeply with Christ since I am now sent into the world to serve His mission. I pray that I can recognize the deceits of Evil and guard myself against them, as Jesus did in the full confidence of God’s Love.

Reflections: Yesterday we were called to return to Galilee, to our “regular life” and usual habits. We have a mission: to work for the Kingdom. Today we consider the beginning of Jesus’ mission and the discernment He went through before beginning His work. The purpose of this meditation is to gain insight into the strategies of Jesus and of the Evil One, knowing that we are called to work for the Kingdom in our ordinary daily living. How will you use your power, gifts, talents, and resources? This is the fundamental question of Jesus’ temptation in the desert.

We are told that the Evil One showed Jesus all the kingdoms of the world and said, “All these I will give you, if you will fall down and worship me.” The answer was: “You shall worship the Lord your God, and Him alone shall you serve.” This moment of crisis in the wilderness is the same moment of crisis that we all face constantly. Can we restrain our desires and wanton need for praise, adulation, power, and comfort? Will our lives be all about using our talents to serve ourselves, or will our lives focus on contributing to society and the world we have inherited?

Call to mind the temptations that beset you. Realize that Jesus -fully human like you- may likewise have suffered any of these same temptations, shameful as they may be. Jesus’ solution to temptation was to recognize it and to rely totally on God. In the same way, we can bring our temptations to Jesus, proclaiming our confidence in Him. Let’s pray that we find ourselves so close to Jesus that we want to choose what He chooses.

As we already said, Jesus doesn’t choose “perfect men and women” to become His disciples. He knows us pretty well. Understanding the kind of persons Jesus chose, Ignatius invites us to ponder first “how they came from a rude and lowly condition of living, and then to realize the dignity to which they were so gently called.” This is our mystery as well: we are born very low, yet called to such lofty service. Temptation is at our door. It is normal.

Ignatius proposes a meditation on three kinds of response to Jesus’ invitation to follow this mission. Ignatius challenges us to reflect on just what it means to find that true spiritual freedom to embrace Jesus’ mission. We are speaking about true freedom, freedom that brings about God’s action in the world. All of us experience attractions that can get in the way of our serving God within the world: we may love money, sex, power, our good looks, appearing well-clothed, having great cars or other stuff. Some folks have good intentions, but they never manage to change their ways of living until the day before their death. Others, deep down, know that something is not quite right, but they keep finding excuses and rationalizations to keep doing the same thing, and even try to convince God that it is really not that bad. Others are free: they can be rich and well-satisfied, if this is God’s will and for God’s service. But they can also be happy and poor, giving up what they are involved with. They can graciously accept prestige insofar as it helps serve Jesus’ mission, but they don’t crave and chase prestige for its own sake, and can easily live without it.

It is entirely human to have attachments which collapse our freedom May we be able to accept graciously any prestige that helps to serve the mission of our King. At the same time may we not shrink from persecution or loss of prestige, if this will produce some greater good and allow us live without positions of power. Perhaps it is sufficient for today’s meditation to simply recognize such harmful attachments and to avoid them. For this grace we beg for God’s light.

Scripture:

Matthew 4: 1-11. The tactics of his adversary are not to tempt Jesus to evil, but rather to become a Messiah of possessions, prestige and power instead of a Messiah of poverty, persecution and powerlessness, as the Father called Him to be.

Ecclesiastes 3:1-22. Humans cannot understand God’s ways. Thus we should definitely stay close to Him. Since everything has its own time, I should hold onto the times of God in my life.

Proverbs 3:1-12. Put your loyalty and faith in God and you will never fail.

Wisdom 3:1-12. Those who trust in God will understand that His Truth is real, and the faithful will abide with God in Love.

Matthew 6:24-34. No one can serve two masters; either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve both God and material wealth.

Final Colloquy: At this stage of our inner journey, we are accustomed to walk with our friend and Lord Jesus Christ, speaking freely with Him as one friend does with another. If you honestly experience the strength and grace within you, invite Jesus to accept you under His banner, joining at His side to build the Kingdom of God. Conclude with the “Our Father.”

Etapa 25

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 25. Cervera – Igualada (38.6 km)

Note: We maintain the same positive spirit as we continue in our “fourth week,” since we feel more and more united with Jesus Christ in His mission. Indeed nothing can hinder our progress towards freedom and eternal happiness in the love of God. Remember the “introductory prayer” and the final colloquy – at the end of the prayer as well as during the day. Rejoice in Christ’s Resurrection! Songs, light, flowers, water, and friends are welcome!

Grace: I beg God to rejoice deeply with the Risen Christ since I have been sent into the world to serve His mission. I pray to recognize His transfigured presence in my life, accompanying Him on his mission to reconcile and give life to all people.

Reflections: Jesus needs our hands to welcome those men and women who need care, reconciliation, Love and Life. Jesus needs our wills, our desires to move forward and build, to continue creating the Kingdom among us. The Risen Jesus calls us to follow Him and to participate with Him in the [gospel] transformation that has already begun in the World. In the gospels, Jesus explicitly calls several people by name. As we contemplate the mysteries proposed today, we hear our own name and discover that our hearts are also stirred. How do I feel as I am called by name today, just as Zacchaeus was? How do I feel invited to climb the mountain of Tabor with Jesus? What does it mean for me to feel close to Jesus?

The story of Jesus’ transfiguration on Mount Tabor proclaims the truth hidden deep within our own humanity, unclear as this may be. The Light is certainly within us. The Divine Essence inhabits us and is noticeable from the first moment of our conception. Our human condition is sometimes a “dark filter” to the Divine Light. But nonetheless we must turn “black holes” into “bright stars.” The suffering, the injustice, and the absurdity that surround us in so many situations … these create the “filter” that can switch off the smallest spark of light. But in the Risen Jesus we discover that, despite all the turmoil in which we live, the Light of Jesus still burns within us – and this experience transforms us. Nothing indeed can separate us from God’s Love. Everything can be transfigured in His Love.

The Risen Jesus is God alive within us. Whoever communicates this message with their time and talents will not fail. What needs to be transformed in my life? What prevents the divine light from shining through me?

Scripture:

Luke 19:1-10. Jesus calls out to Zacchaeus and invites him to “descend” from his concerns and lifestyle. If you want to see Jesus, leave behind the fabrications you have made. If you want to meet Jesus in your life, return to your home. He awaits you there. Open your heart to Him, that this reunion will be generous and transforming.

Romans 8:31-39. Nothing can separate us from the love of God.

Matthew 17:1-13. Jesus calls his disciples and invites them to accompany him on his journey of transfiguration. I also need to go up the mountain with Him. So much pain and so many difficulties can undermine our faith and determination. But if we believe in the Resurrection, we also believe that Life has no ending. Nothing can hide the Light within us. Nothing can silence the Word [of God] within us?

Matthew 17:14-21. Called to serve Jesus Christ and to share together in mission, our faith cannot be weak. If we believe in Jesus we will not fail. If we believe only in ourselves and our possibilities, we will achieve nothing – even if we bear His name.

Final colloquy: At this point in our interior pilgrimage, we are accustomed to walk with Jesus Christ, our friend and Lord, speaking freely with Him as one friend does with another. If you are personally able to find the strength and grace within you, beg Jesus to be accepted under His banner and thus to build the Kingdom of God at His side. Conclude with the “Our Father.”

Cervera – Igualada

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 25. Cervera – Igualada (38.6 km)

Note: We maintain the same positive spirit as we continue in our “fourth week,” since we feel more and more united with Jesus Christ in His mission. Indeed nothing can hinder our progress towards freedom and eternal happiness in the love of God. Remember the “introductory prayer” and the final colloquy – at the end of the prayer as well as during the day. Rejoice in Christ’s Resurrection! Songs, light, flowers, water, and friends are welcome!

Grace: I beg God to rejoice deeply with the Risen Christ since I have been sent into the world to serve His mission. I pray to recognize His transfigured presence in my life, accompanying Him on his mission to reconcile and give life to all people.

Reflections: Jesus needs our hands to welcome those men and women who need care, reconciliation, Love and Life. Jesus needs our wills, our desires to move forward and build, to continue creating the Kingdom among us. The Risen Jesus calls us to follow Him and to participate with Him in the [gospel] transformation that has already begun in the World. In the gospels, Jesus explicitly calls several people by name. As we contemplate the mysteries proposed today, we hear our own name and discover that our hearts are also stirred. How do I feel as I am called by name today, just as Zacchaeus was? How do I feel invited to climb the mountain of Tabor with Jesus? What does it mean for me to feel close to Jesus?

The story of Jesus’ transfiguration on Mount Tabor proclaims the truth hidden deep within our own humanity, unclear as this may be. The Light is certainly within us. The Divine Essence inhabits us and is noticeable from the first moment of our conception. Our human condition is sometimes a “dark filter” to the Divine Light. But nonetheless we must turn “black holes” into “bright stars.” The suffering, the injustice, and the absurdity that surround us in so many situations … these create the “filter” that can switch off the smallest spark of light. But in the Risen Jesus we discover that, despite all the turmoil in which we live, the Light of Jesus still burns within us – and this experience transforms us. Nothing indeed can separate us from God’s Love. Everything can be transfigured in His Love.

The Risen Jesus is God alive within us. Whoever communicates this message with their time and talents will not fail. What needs to be transformed in my life? What prevents the divine light from shining through me?

Scripture:

Luke 19:1-10. Jesus calls out to Zacchaeus and invites him to “descend” from his concerns and lifestyle. If you want to see Jesus, leave behind the fabrications you have made. If you want to meet Jesus in your life, return to your home. He awaits you there. Open your heart to Him, that this reunion will be generous and transforming.

Romans 8:31-39. Nothing can separate us from the love of God.

Matthew 17:1-13. Jesus calls his disciples and invites them to accompany him on his journey of transfiguration. I also need to go up the mountain with Him. So much pain and so many difficulties can undermine our faith and determination. But if we believe in the Resurrection, we also believe that Life has no ending. Nothing can hide the Light within us. Nothing can silence the Word [of God] within us?

Matthew 17:14-21. Called to serve Jesus Christ and to share together in mission, our faith cannot be weak. If we believe in Jesus we will not fail. If we believe only in ourselves and our possibilities, we will achieve nothing – even if we bear His name.

Final colloquy: At this point in our interior pilgrimage, we are accustomed to walk with Jesus Christ, our friend and Lord, speaking freely with Him as one friend does with another. If you are personally able to find the strength and grace within you, beg Jesus to be accepted under His banner and thus to build the Kingdom of God at His side. Conclude with the “Our Father.”

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 25. Cervera – Igualada (38.6 km)

Note: We maintain the same positive spirit as we continue in our “fourth week,” since we feel more and more united with Jesus Christ in His mission. Indeed nothing can hinder our progress towards freedom and eternal happiness in the love of God. Remember the “introductory prayer” and the final colloquy – at the end of the prayer as well as during the day. Rejoice in Christ’s Resurrection! Songs, light, flowers, water, and friends are welcome!

Grace: I beg God to rejoice deeply with the Risen Christ since I have been sent into the world to serve His mission. I pray to recognize His transfigured presence in my life, accompanying Him on his mission to reconcile and give life to all people.

Reflections: Jesus needs our hands to welcome those men and women who need care, reconciliation, Love and Life. Jesus needs our wills, our desires to move forward and build, to continue creating the Kingdom among us. The Risen Jesus calls us to follow Him and to participate with Him in the [gospel] transformation that has already begun in the World. In the gospels, Jesus explicitly calls several people by name. As we contemplate the mysteries proposed today, we hear our own name and discover that our hearts are also stirred. How do I feel as I am called by name today, just as Zacchaeus was? How do I feel invited to climb the mountain of Tabor with Jesus? What does it mean for me to feel close to Jesus?

The story of Jesus’ transfiguration on Mount Tabor proclaims the truth hidden deep within our own humanity, unclear as this may be. The Light is certainly within us. The Divine Essence inhabits us and is noticeable from the first moment of our conception. Our human condition is sometimes a “dark filter” to the Divine Light. But nonetheless we must turn “black holes” into “bright stars.” The suffering, the injustice, and the absurdity that surround us in so many situations … these create the “filter” that can switch off the smallest spark of light. But in the Risen Jesus we discover that, despite all the turmoil in which we live, the Light of Jesus still burns within us – and this experience transforms us. Nothing indeed can separate us from God’s Love. Everything can be transfigured in His Love.

The Risen Jesus is God alive within us. Whoever communicates this message with their time and talents will not fail. What needs to be transformed in my life? What prevents the divine light from shining through me?

Scripture:

Luke 19:1-10. Jesus calls out to Zacchaeus and invites him to “descend” from his concerns and lifestyle. If you want to see Jesus, leave behind the fabrications you have made. If you want to meet Jesus in your life, return to your home. He awaits you there. Open your heart to Him, that this reunion will be generous and transforming.

Romans 8:31-39. Nothing can separate us from the love of God.

Matthew 17:1-13. Jesus calls his disciples and invites them to accompany him on his journey of transfiguration. I also need to go up the mountain with Him. So much pain and so many difficulties can undermine our faith and determination. But if we believe in the Resurrection, we also believe that Life has no ending. Nothing can hide the Light within us. Nothing can silence the Word [of God] within us?

Matthew 17:14-21. Called to serve Jesus Christ and to share together in mission, our faith cannot be weak. If we believe in Jesus we will not fail. If we believe only in ourselves and our possibilities, we will achieve nothing – even if we bear His name.

Final colloquy: At this point in our interior pilgrimage, we are accustomed to walk with Jesus Christ, our friend and Lord, speaking freely with Him as one friend does with another. If you are personally able to find the strength and grace within you, beg Jesus to be accepted under His banner and thus to build the Kingdom of God at His side. Conclude with the “Our Father.”

Etapa 26

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 26. Igualada – Montserrat (27 km)

Notes: Easter joy continues within us. Remember to begin with the “introductory prayer” and to conclude with the final colloquy, and to pray it throughout the day. Live the joy of Christ’s Resurrection!. Songs, light, flowers, water and friends are welcome! Our Ignatian journey invites us today to do as Ignatius did: spend some special prayer time with the Black Virgin of Montserrat.

Grace: I beg God that I may rejoice deeply with the Risen Christ since I have also been sent into the world to serve His mission. I pray to receive the Holy Spirit so I can better accompany Jesus in His mission to reconcile the world and bring life to all persons.

Reflections: the Spirit of God confirms us in the mission we have received from Christ. Moreover, the same Spirit remains with us and strengthens us in any difficulties that come our way. We follow the dynamics of previous weeks: the true King invites us to accompany him in his conquest of good against the absurd destruction of all that is human. The Spirit strengthens us in our journey across the world, preaching the Good News.

The Spirit breaks down barriers and opens pathways. The Spirit creates fraternity, creates community, and brings forth the Image of God in the world. The Spirit awakens us, enlightens us, and removes our deafness and blindness. The Spirit launches us and pushes us forward, and does not allow us to sit still for very long. The Spirit challenges us, pulls us away from our creature comforts, and breaks through our well-planned schemes. The Spirit fills us with compassion, love, and the desire for solidarity. The Spirit raises us up, helps us to dream, and exalts us. In the Spirit we can hope for everything, we can bear everything, we can accomplish everything. The Spirit is the actual presence of God in our daily lives.

Throughout our pilgrimage we have been “breathing in” the Spirit. Today we beg for a deep awareness of the Holy Spirit’s presence within us. Where do I find the Spirit working within me? Within others? Do I recognize the “action” of the Spirit within the world? Remember to beg for this important grace.

Scripture:

John 16:5-15. I recall the words of Jesus about the work of the Holy Spirit.

Acts 2:1-21. The promise of the Spirit’s coming is fulfilled on the day of Pentecost.

Acts 10:44-48. While Peter was speaking, the Holy Spirit came down upon all those who were listening. The work of evangelization had begun. I ask to embrace this challenge with energy and commitment.

Luke 4:14-20. Jesus returned to Galilee, filled with the power of the Spirit. I pray that my return home will also be filled with the Spirit. I need God’s Holy Spirit to fulfill the mission of God’s Kingdom.

Final colloquy: At this stage of our interior pilgrimage, we are accustomed to walk with our friend and Lord, Jesus Christ, speaking freely as one friend does with another. Conclude with the “Our Father.”

Igualada – Montserrat

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 26. Igualada – Montserrat (27 km)

Notes: Easter joy continues within us. Remember to begin with the “introductory prayer” and to conclude with the final colloquy, and to pray it throughout the day. Live the joy of Christ’s Resurrection!. Songs, light, flowers, water and friends are welcome! Our Ignatian journey invites us today to do as Ignatius did: spend some special prayer time with the Black Virgin of Montserrat.

Grace: I beg God that I may rejoice deeply with the Risen Christ since I have also been sent into the world to serve His mission. I pray to receive the Holy Spirit so I can better accompany Jesus in His mission to reconcile the world and bring life to all persons.

Reflections: the Spirit of God confirms us in the mission we have received from Christ. Moreover, the same Spirit remains with us and strengthens us in any difficulties that come our way. We follow the dynamics of previous weeks: the true King invites us to accompany him in his conquest of good against the absurd destruction of all that is human. The Spirit strengthens us in our journey across the world, preaching the Good News.

The Spirit breaks down barriers and opens pathways. The Spirit creates fraternity, creates community, and brings forth the Image of God in the world. The Spirit awakens us, enlightens us, and removes our deafness and blindness. The Spirit launches us and pushes us forward, and does not allow us to sit still for very long. The Spirit challenges us, pulls us away from our creature comforts, and breaks through our well-planned schemes. The Spirit fills us with compassion, love, and the desire for solidarity. The Spirit raises us up, helps us to dream, and exalts us. In the Spirit we can hope for everything, we can bear everything, we can accomplish everything. The Spirit is the actual presence of God in our daily lives.

Throughout our pilgrimage we have been “breathing in” the Spirit. Today we beg for a deep awareness of the Holy Spirit’s presence within us. Where do I find the Spirit working within me? Within others? Do I recognize the “action” of the Spirit within the world? Remember to beg for this important grace.

Scripture:

John 16:5-15. I recall the words of Jesus about the work of the Holy Spirit.

Acts 2:1-21. The promise of the Spirit’s coming is fulfilled on the day of Pentecost.

Acts 10:44-48. While Peter was speaking, the Holy Spirit came down upon all those who were listening. The work of evangelization had begun. I ask to embrace this challenge with energy and commitment.

Luke 4:14-20. Jesus returned to Galilee, filled with the power of the Spirit. I pray that my return home will also be filled with the Spirit. I need God’s Holy Spirit to fulfill the mission of God’s Kingdom.

Final colloquy: At this stage of our interior pilgrimage, we are accustomed to walk with our friend and Lord, Jesus Christ, speaking freely as one friend does with another. Conclude with the “Our Father.”

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 26. Igualada – Montserrat (27 km)

Notes: Easter joy continues within us. Remember to begin with the “introductory prayer” and to conclude with the final colloquy, and to pray it throughout the day. Live the joy of Christ’s Resurrection!. Songs, light, flowers, water and friends are welcome! Our Ignatian journey invites us today to do as Ignatius did: spend some special prayer time with the Black Virgin of Montserrat.

Grace: I beg God that I may rejoice deeply with the Risen Christ since I have also been sent into the world to serve His mission. I pray to receive the Holy Spirit so I can better accompany Jesus in His mission to reconcile the world and bring life to all persons.

Reflections: the Spirit of God confirms us in the mission we have received from Christ. Moreover, the same Spirit remains with us and strengthens us in any difficulties that come our way. We follow the dynamics of previous weeks: the true King invites us to accompany him in his conquest of good against the absurd destruction of all that is human. The Spirit strengthens us in our journey across the world, preaching the Good News.

The Spirit breaks down barriers and opens pathways. The Spirit creates fraternity, creates community, and brings forth the Image of God in the world. The Spirit awakens us, enlightens us, and removes our deafness and blindness. The Spirit launches us and pushes us forward, and does not allow us to sit still for very long. The Spirit challenges us, pulls us away from our creature comforts, and breaks through our well-planned schemes. The Spirit fills us with compassion, love, and the desire for solidarity. The Spirit raises us up, helps us to dream, and exalts us. In the Spirit we can hope for everything, we can bear everything, we can accomplish everything. The Spirit is the actual presence of God in our daily lives.

Throughout our pilgrimage we have been “breathing in” the Spirit. Today we beg for a deep awareness of the Holy Spirit’s presence within us. Where do I find the Spirit working within me? Within others? Do I recognize the “action” of the Spirit within the world? Remember to beg for this important grace.

Scripture:

John 16:5-15. I recall the words of Jesus about the work of the Holy Spirit.

Acts 2:1-21. The promise of the Spirit’s coming is fulfilled on the day of Pentecost.

Acts 10:44-48. While Peter was speaking, the Holy Spirit came down upon all those who were listening. The work of evangelization had begun. I ask to embrace this challenge with energy and commitment.

Luke 4:14-20. Jesus returned to Galilee, filled with the power of the Spirit. I pray that my return home will also be filled with the Spirit. I need God’s Holy Spirit to fulfill the mission of God’s Kingdom.

Final colloquy: At this stage of our interior pilgrimage, we are accustomed to walk with our friend and Lord, Jesus Christ, speaking freely as one friend does with another. Conclude with the “Our Father.”

Etapa 27

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 27. Montserrat – Manresa (24,6 km)

Notes: Great joy stays with us during this final stage of the “outer” journey. The long cherished goal of Manresa is at hand! Remember the “introductory prayer” and the final colloquy both at the end of the prayer and also during the day. May our hearts be filled with the strength of the Holy Spirit, and may the Spirit’s strength go with us on this milestone day in our lives. The Ignatian path for today invites us to continue our inner pilgrimage. Don’t forget to look at our last meditation in Manresa.

Grace: I beg God to give me an intimate knowledge of the many gifts I have received. Filled with gratitude for these many gifts, may I love and serve the Divine Majesty.

Reflections: The Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are always at work sharing themselves with us. This sharing empowers us to be contemplatives-in-action, finding God in all things. The Jesuits decreed in their 32nd General Congregation that “each member of every Jesuit community must be mindful of what St. Ignatius says about love – that it consists in sharing what one has, who one is, and all those whom one loves. Today will focus our meditation on this experience of love as an exchange of who one is and what one shares with the beloved. In the Spiritual Exercises, Ignatius invites us to understand just how God’s Love is given to us and shared so generously out of God’s great goodness. With this cascade of gifts and graces, we must also respond in a generous and loving way. We will follow the directions of Ignatius to let our hearts expand in the Love of God. The steps of this Ignatian contemplation are as follows:

CONTEMPLATION TO ATTAIN LOVE.

Two things should be noted: The first is that love is expressed more in actions than in words. The second is that love is a communication between two persons. It is to know, to give, and to communicate from the lover to the one loved, and vice versa, whatever one has or is able to have. So, if one has wisdom, he shares this with the one who has not, or honors and riches from the one who has to the one who does not.

Then I return to the introductory prayer and ask that everything be directed to God’s will. Next I center myself within the prayer. I imagine that I stand before God the Father, Jesus the Son, and the Spirit of Love who created me in my humanity. I call to mind today’s conscious desire: I ask the Father to give me an intimate knowledge of the many gifts I have received so that, filled with gratitude for all of them, I may love and serve the Divine Majesty in every way.

And I begin my contemplation. The first point is to call to mind the benefits received from God: the fact of being born and of being saved by Jesus, as well as for all those personal gifts I enjoy. I consider all that God our Lord has done for me and how much of Himself God has shared with me. Aware of this reality, I ponder with much reason and justice what I might offer and return to His Divine Majesty, that is to say all my possessions and all of myself.

Then, as you wish, consider that anyone who desires to be more responsive to God will make the following self-offering: “Take, Lord, and receive all my liberty, my memory, my under-standing, and my entire will – all I have and call my own. You have given everything to me. So I return it, to be used according to your will. Give me only your love and grace. These are enough for me.”

Completing the first point, Ignatius proposes a second point: notice how God dwells in all of creation and in all living creatures: giving life to all natural elements, bringing vegetation to the plants, sense to the animals, and understanding to humans. God also gives me life, encouragement, direction, and understanding. God also makes me a holy temple, created in His likeness and Divine image. I then reflect on myself –how I live, what I accomplish, and how I may serve. I end this point by returning to the previous prayer of self-offering: “Take Lord and receive…”

The third point is to consider how God actually works and labors for me in all created things: everything in the heavens and the elements, plants, fruits, animals, etc. God gives and preserves all life, giving awareness, vegetation, etc. Then I think about myself: what can I do to return this love I have received. I finish this point by returning to the previous prayer of self-offering: “Take Lord and receive…”

The fourth: notice how every good gift descends from above, and my own strength comes only from God’s infinite power. Thus justice, goodness, mercy, all other good gifts that I recognize in myself as well as in the world (like the rays from the sun, our water supply, etc.) all come from God. After considering the origins of all that is good, I consider myself and the way I will make a return for all that I have received. I end this reflection by returning to the self-offering prayer above: “Take Lord and receive …” Finish with the usual colloquy and the “Our Father.”

Final colloquy: At this point in our inner pilgrimage, we are accustomed to walk with our friend and Lord Jesus Christ, speaking freely as one friend does with another. Conclude with the “Our Father.”

Montserrat – Manresa

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 27. Montserrat – Manresa (24,6 km)

Notes: Great joy stays with us during this final stage of the “outer” journey. The long cherished goal of Manresa is at hand! Remember the “introductory prayer” and the final colloquy both at the end of the prayer and also during the day. May our hearts be filled with the strength of the Holy Spirit, and may the Spirit’s strength go with us on this milestone day in our lives. The Ignatian path for today invites us to continue our inner pilgrimage. Don’t forget to look at our last meditation in Manresa.

Grace: I beg God to give me an intimate knowledge of the many gifts I have received. Filled with gratitude for these many gifts, may I love and serve the Divine Majesty.

Reflections: The Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are always at work sharing themselves with us. This sharing empowers us to be contemplatives-in-action, finding God in all things. The Jesuits decreed in their 32nd General Congregation that “each member of every Jesuit community must be mindful of what St. Ignatius says about love – that it consists in sharing what one has, who one is, and all those whom one loves. Today will focus our meditation on this experience of love as an exchange of who one is and what one shares with the beloved. In the Spiritual Exercises, Ignatius invites us to understand just how God’s Love is given to us and shared so generously out of God’s great goodness. With this cascade of gifts and graces, we must also respond in a generous and loving way. We will follow the directions of Ignatius to let our hearts expand in the Love of God. The steps of this Ignatian contemplation are as follows:

CONTEMPLATION TO ATTAIN LOVE.

Two things should be noted: The first is that love is expressed more in actions than in words. The second is that love is a communication between two persons. It is to know, to give, and to communicate from the lover to the one loved, and vice versa, whatever one has or is able to have. So, if one has wisdom, he shares this with the one who has not, or honors and riches from the one who has to the one who does not.

Then I return to the introductory prayer and ask that everything be directed to God’s will. Next I center myself within the prayer. I imagine that I stand before God the Father, Jesus the Son, and the Spirit of Love who created me in my humanity. I call to mind today’s conscious desire: I ask the Father to give me an intimate knowledge of the many gifts I have received so that, filled with gratitude for all of them, I may love and serve the Divine Majesty in every way.

And I begin my contemplation. The first point is to call to mind the benefits received from God: the fact of being born and of being saved by Jesus, as well as for all those personal gifts I enjoy. I consider all that God our Lord has done for me and how much of Himself God has shared with me. Aware of this reality, I ponder with much reason and justice what I might offer and return to His Divine Majesty, that is to say all my possessions and all of myself.

Then, as you wish, consider that anyone who desires to be more responsive to God will make the following self-offering: “Take, Lord, and receive all my liberty, my memory, my under-standing, and my entire will – all I have and call my own. You have given everything to me. So I return it, to be used according to your will. Give me only your love and grace. These are enough for me.”

Completing the first point, Ignatius proposes a second point: notice how God dwells in all of creation and in all living creatures: giving life to all natural elements, bringing vegetation to the plants, sense to the animals, and understanding to humans. God also gives me life, encouragement, direction, and understanding. God also makes me a holy temple, created in His likeness and Divine image. I then reflect on myself –how I live, what I accomplish, and how I may serve. I end this point by returning to the previous prayer of self-offering: “Take Lord and receive…”

The third point is to consider how God actually works and labors for me in all created things: everything in the heavens and the elements, plants, fruits, animals, etc. God gives and preserves all life, giving awareness, vegetation, etc. Then I think about myself: what can I do to return this love I have received. I finish this point by returning to the previous prayer of self-offering: “Take Lord and receive…”

The fourth: notice how every good gift descends from above, and my own strength comes only from God’s infinite power. Thus justice, goodness, mercy, all other good gifts that I recognize in myself as well as in the world (like the rays from the sun, our water supply, etc.) all come from God. After considering the origins of all that is good, I consider myself and the way I will make a return for all that I have received. I end this reflection by returning to the self-offering prayer above: “Take Lord and receive …” Finish with the usual colloquy and the “Our Father.”

Final colloquy: At this point in our inner pilgrimage, we are accustomed to walk with our friend and Lord Jesus Christ, speaking freely as one friend does with another. Conclude with the “Our Father.”

Pistas Ignacianas - Step 27. Montserrat – Manresa (24,6 km)

Notes: Great joy stays with us during this final stage of the “outer” journey. The long cherished goal of Manresa is at hand! Remember the “introductory prayer” and the final colloquy both at the end of the prayer and also during the day. May our hearts be filled with the strength of the Holy Spirit, and may the Spirit’s strength go with us on this milestone day in our lives. The Ignatian path for today invites us to continue our inner pilgrimage. Don’t forget to look at our last meditation in Manresa.

Grace: I beg God to give me an intimate knowledge of the many gifts I have received. Filled with gratitude for these many gifts, may I love and serve the Divine Majesty.

Reflections: The Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are always at work sharing themselves with us. This sharing empowers us to be contemplatives-in-action, finding God in all things. The Jesuits decreed in their 32nd General Congregation that “each member of every Jesuit community must be mindful of what St. Ignatius says about love – that it consists in sharing what one has, who one is, and all those whom one loves. Today will focus our meditation on this experience of love as an exchange of who one is and what one shares with the beloved. In the Spiritual Exercises, Ignatius invites us to understand just how God’s Love is given to us and shared so generously out of God’s great goodness. With this cascade of gifts and graces, we must also respond in a generous and loving way. We will follow the directions of Ignatius to let our hearts expand in the Love of God. The steps of this Ignatian contemplation are as follows:

CONTEMPLATION TO ATTAIN LOVE.

Two things should be noted: The first is that love is expressed more in actions than in words. The second is that love is a communication between two persons. It is to know, to give, and to communicate from the lover to the one loved, and vice versa, whatever one has or is able to have. So, if one has wisdom, he shares this with the one who has not, or honors and riches from the one who has to the one who does not.

Then I return to the introductory prayer and ask that everything be directed to God’s will. Next I center myself within the prayer. I imagine that I stand before God the Father, Jesus the Son, and the Spirit of Love who created me in my humanity. I call to mind today’s conscious desire: I ask the Father to give me an intimate knowledge of the many gifts I have received so that, filled with gratitude for all of them, I may love and serve the Divine Majesty in every way.

And I begin my contemplation. The first point is to call to mind the benefits received from God: the fact of being born and of being saved by Jesus, as well as for all those personal gifts I enjoy. I consider all that God our Lord has done for me and how much of Himself God has shared with me. Aware of this reality, I ponder with much reason and justice what I might offer and return to His Divine Majesty, that is to say all my possessions and all of myself.

Then, as you wish, consider that anyone who desires to be more responsive to God will make the following self-offering: “Take, Lord, and receive all my liberty, my memory, my under-standing, and my entire will – all I have and call my own. You have given everything to me. So I return it, to be used according to your will. Give me only your love and grace. These are enough for me.”

Completing the first point, Ignatius proposes a second point: notice how God dwells in all of creation and in all living creatures: giving life to all natural elements, bringing vegetation to the plants, sense to the animals, and understanding to humans. God also gives me life, encouragement, direction, and understanding. God also makes me a holy temple, created in His likeness and Divine image. I then reflect on myself –how I live, what I accomplish, and how I may serve. I end this point by returning to the previous prayer of self-offering: “Take Lord and receive…”

The third point is to consider how God actually works and labors for me in all created things: everything in the heavens and the elements, plants, fruits, animals, etc. God gives and preserves all life, giving awareness, vegetation, etc. Then I think about myself: what can I do to return this love I have received. I finish this point by returning to the previous prayer of self-offering: “Take Lord and receive…”

The fourth: notice how every good gift descends from above, and my own strength comes only from God’s infinite power. Thus justice, goodness, mercy, all other good gifts that I recognize in myself as well as in the world (like the rays from the sun, our water supply, etc.) all come from God. After considering the origins of all that is good, I consider myself and the way I will make a return for all that I have received. I end this reflection by returning to the self-offering prayer above: “Take Lord and receive …” Finish with the usual colloquy and the “Our Father.”

Final colloquy: At this point in our inner pilgrimage, we are accustomed to walk with our friend and Lord Jesus Christ, speaking freely as one friend does with another. Conclude with the “Our Father.”